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Washboard Road Feel

jhnjohnp

Member
38
2
8
Spoke to Lincoln Concierge at 1-800-521-4140, as well again to my dealer about diagnostic fee under the CPO 6 yrs. 100,0000 warranty, and this was their answer in a nutshell. Repairs have a $100.00 deductible, and if they spend time trouble shooting a problem they confirm, and is covered by the warranty, your only out of pocket is $100.00. However, if they cant confirm your complaint/problem, your are responsible for a diagnostic fee for time spent troubleshooting your car. Labor rate is $140.00 an hour so do the math. And believe me it took some time to establish that much cause no one initially had a clear answer. To their credit, Lincoln said they would reach out to the dealer about my Lincoln Ride Control issues, let's see what happens.
 
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jhnjohnp

Member
38
2
8
I would love to find a way to disconnect the electrical connections to all 4 needlessly complex shock absorbers. Driving the car around a day or two with those disconnected would prove whether or not this hypersensitivity to road surface problem is a malfunction of the shock control system or something else.
Great Idea, and I also thought of it myself. FYI a company called Xineering makes bypass kits to delete GM's magnetic ride control cause of similar problems. I called them, and for Ford they have one for the Mustang, but so far none for the MKZ. When it gets warmer I may disconnect the shocks/struts to look for improvement. Each shock/strut has a lead wire with a connector, so you can disconnect them, but you will get some type of error on the dash.
 
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jhnjohnp

Member
38
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8
I have not crawled under there yet -- how accessible are those connectors ?
Looks easy enough. Video link shows how to replace rear shocks on MKZ and Fusion. Would like to know all quirks you are experiencing with your Ride Control. In my case, hard bumps, pitching side to side, and flaky steering now and then. My car is in the shop for replacing a damaged passenger side mirror ($1900.), and currently renting a Cadillac XTS (same 19" wheel) which rides close to the MKZ, but minus the above mentioned problems. I included the video to show you how to get to the connector, and also I plan to unbolt the top of each rear shock and check for weakness in one or the other.

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jhnjohnp

Member
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8
The video seems to show that (if I can get my hand up in there) the cable just unplugs from the shock. Right ?
The shock and auto end both have cables that meet at their respective connectors and release by squeezing the locking tab, and make sure you secure them together with tape, etc. so they won't flop around. Just focus on the video where he disconnects the two connectors. Don't know why Ford went with this arrangement. I have driven older MKZ's, Fusion, and my daughters 2007 Mercury Milan all of which drove really well with no problems. I read one review where the driver could no longer switch between comfort, normal, and sport. According to the driver the dealer had no fix. Now that I think of it since you're not replacing the shock there's no need to free up the cable just find the connectors and separate them. Once again you will get an error, and disconnected shock may reduce your high end speed. Below is shock with wire. This is not a permanent fix. The delete kits they make for other cars provide resister connectors that plug into the chassis cable which fool the computer as if were still connected to the shock.

1578969678660.png
 
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JWR

Junior Member
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In the video it appeared to me that JUST disconnecting the shock was simply unplugging one small plug (not the bigger one with 2 halves.) The rest of that operation had to do with removing the shock and we do not need to do that in order to just unplug it for a test.
 

jhnjohnp

Member
38
2
8
In the video it appeared to me that JUST disconnecting the shock was simply unplugging one small plug (not the bigger one with 2 halves.) The rest of that operation had to do with removing the shock and we do not need to do that in order to just unplug it for a test.
Right, you are not removing the shock, but as I mentioned the shock and chassis of the car have cables that join at the 2 connectors. If you look closely at the video you see him depressing the locking tab and separating the two cables. Good luck on this.
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jhnjohnp

Member
38
2
8
Here's my final take for the time being, and I'll tell you why. I've owned this car since June of 19, and on 3 to 4 occasions, although briefly, the suspension did seem to perform as designed. Car was extremely stable, pitching and rolling negative, and no harshness. Road seem to disappear beneath me, then poof, it was gone. I believe mechanically it's OK, which leads me to believe faulty control module, corrupt software. etc.. Fortunately I bought the car used at less than half the MSRP or else I would be really ticked off. Since I've been on this forum I have test driven 2 other 2016's, both turbos-one FWD, and one AWD, their ride was worse. We can't re-engineer this set up. Only way to go, if parts were available, would be to replace springs and shocks/struts as well as disable the Ride Control. Ford could probably come up with a fix, but then again, talking money here.
 
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bbf2530

Junior Member
648
180
43
Here's my final take for the time being, and I'll tell you why. I've owned this car since June of 19, and on 3 to 4 occasions, although briefly, the suspension did seem to perform as designed. Car was extremely stable, pitching and rolling negative, and no harshness. Road seem to disappear beneath me, then poof, it was gone. I believe mechanically it's OK, which leads me to believe faulty control module, corrupt software. etc.. Fortunately I bought the car used at less than have the MSRP or else I would be really ticked off. Since I've been on this forum I have test driven 2 other 2016's, both turbos-one FWD, and one AWD, their ride was worse. We can't re-engineer this set up. Only way to go, if parts were available, would be to replace springs and shocks/struts as well as disable the Ride Control. Ford could probably come up with a fix, but then again, talking money here.
Hi jhnjohn. I can report that my 2018 3.0T AWD exhibits none of the ride and handling issues that your car or the others you test drove exhibited. Unfortunately that does little to assist you.

From your description, it would seem to be an obvious problem to anyone else that drives the car and they should be able to pinpoint the cause. Although it seems some of your local Dealership personnel are not good on accurate information, have you tried another Lincoln Service Department?

I hope you can find some sort of resolution.
 

jhnjohnp

Member
38
2
8
Hi jhnjohn. I can report that my 2018 3.0T AWD exhibits none of the ride and handling issues that your car or the others you test drove exhibited. Unfortunately that does little to assist you.

From your description, it would seem to be an obvious problem to anyone else that drives the car and they should be able to pinpoint the cause. Although it seems some of your local Dealership personnel are not good on accurate information, have you tried another Lincoln Service Department?
of
I hope you can find some sort of resolution.
OK thanks. Your are fortunate, and believe I'm one the unlucky ones, as verified by this thread.
Had my car in the shop for side view mirror damage, and rented a Cadillac XTS, what a pleasure to drive. Will try the dealer again now that Lincoln Concierge called them and gave them a heads up of my concerns.
 
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JWR

Junior Member
30
0
6
Hi jhnjohn. I can report that my 2018 3.0T AWD exhibits none of the ride and handling issues that your car or the others you test drove exhibited. Unfortunately that does little to assist you.

From your description, it would seem to be an obvious problem to anyone else that drives the car and they should be able to pinpoint the cause. Although it seems some of your local Dealership personnel are not good on accurate information, have you tried another Lincoln Service Department?

I hope you can find some sort of resolution.
Yours being a 2018 might indicate that some bug was fixed since my 2013 was made. That is on the edge of encouraging. Mine has 60K miles on it now and has always had the problem (I bought it with 11K miles on it and less than a year after the original buyer (whom I would pay money to talk to !!). I have driven other MKZs that do not have anywhwere near as obvious a problem as mine b ut they do have SOME. The one thing I really want to try before totally giving up is to disconnect all 4 electrical connections at the shocks. That would eliminate them and their control system as culprits. Beyond that I have already given up. Thanks for your comments.
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bbf2530

Junior Member
648
180
43
Yours being a 2018 might indicate that some bug was fixed since my 2013 was made. That is on the edge of encouraging. Mine has 60K miles on it now and has always had the problem (I bought it with 11K miles on it and less than a year after the original buyer (whom I would pay money to talk to !!). I have driven other MKZs that do not have anywhwere near as obvious a problem as mine b ut they do have SOME. The one thing I really want to try before totally giving up is to disconnect all 4 electrical connections at the shocks. That would eliminate them and their control system as culprits. Beyond that I have already given up. Thanks for your comments.
Hi JWR. I hope you can find the underlying cause/issue.

I do want to add: I quickly read through from the beginning of this thread, and this is certainly not a widespread issue, since out of all the replies on this thread, only you and jhnjohn (and maybe one other member) seem to have the issue. There are a lot of posts by some of us, but only 2-3 with the actual issue. Most of the posts are other members weighing in to try and help.

The reason I mention this? While I realize it does nothing to alleviate your problem, the fact that it is not a "common" issue that everyone has should make it easier to find the cause, since it is not an inherent/widespread design issue.
In other words, since most of us have 2nd generation MKZ's with correctly working CCD suspensions, yours should be able to be fixed. I hope this will be the case. Hope that makes sense.

Keep us updated and good luck.
 

jhnjohnp

Member
38
2
8
Hi JWR. I hope you can find the underlying cause/issue.

I do want to add: I quickly read through from the beginning of this thread, and this is certainly not a widespread issue, since out of all the replies on this thread, only you and jhnjohn (and maybe one other member) seem to have the issue. There are a lot of posts by some of us, but only 2-3 with the actual issue. Most of the posts are other members weighing in to try and help.

The reason I mention this? While I realize it does nothing to alleviate your problem, the fact that it is not a "common" issue that everyone has should make it easier to find the cause, since it is not an inherent/widespread design issue.
In other words, since most of us have 2nd generation MKZ's with correctly working CCD suspensions, yours should be able to be fixed. I hope this will be the case. Hope that makes sense.

Keep us updated and good luck.
I wanted to hold my piece until I visited the dealer again, but couldn't. Let's say 3 on this thread plus the 2 other 16's I drove, and that makes 5. I expect us 3 are a minority cause based on info here, and Consumer Reports giving the suspension on 15 thru 19 much better than average, and sorry to advise, the 2013 much worse than average. That might explain our 2013 owner's situation. Been driving for over 50 yrs, driveway mechanic for most of that, and my experience with dealer service tells me if they were in the health business there would be lot less of us around complaining. Until then, let me say my 2016 ain't that bad, but it's no Signature Lincoln Ride.
 
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jhnjohnp

Member
38
2
8
I wanted to hold my piece until I visited the dealer again, but couldn't. Let's say 3 on this thread plus the 2 other 16's I drove, and that makes 5. I expect us 3 are a minority cause based on info here, and Consumer Reports giving the suspension on 15 thru 19 much better than average, and sorry to advise, the 2013 much worse than average. That might explain our 2013 owner's situation. Been driving for over 50 yrs, driveway mechanic for most of that, and my experience with dealer service tells me if they were in the health business there would be lot less of us around complaining. Until then, let me say my 2016 ain't that bad, but it's no Signature Lincoln Ride.
Replying to myself. Might be worth a shot to pull the neg. battery cable, let the car set overnight, and then reconx. The first few days the car will run like crap until all the systems reboot, relearn, etc., but you may experience an improvement in performance.
 

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