Washboard Road Feel

bbf2530

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Hope somebody comes up with a fix. It's not the tires. The ride control is inconsistent. When it's working get an amazing stable ride, other times not so hot, and at it's worst intolerable in all modes, that is, comfort, normal, and sport. Discovered GM owners are having similar problems with their "MagneRide" to a point where they are disabling the system, and installing conventional struts/shocks. They sell after market kits for that purpose, but so far found no such option for Lincoln ride control. Haven't brought it to the dealer yet, but get the feeling their response will be, "Operating as designed".
Hi jhnjohnp. You purchased your 2016 MKZ in June with 43,000 miles on it. How much time and miles are left on your 4 year/50,000 mile Bumper to Bumper warranty? You are not happy with the ride and feel something is wrong, so why not make an appointment so any issues can be diagnosed and serviced before the warranty expires, instead of guessing what the dealer can and can't do or what their "response will be"?

It is entirely possible something was wrong with the car when you purchased it and the previous owner never addressed it either. Could be as simple as a broken or defective shock/shocks due to something that happened while the previous owner had the car.

Also, what PSI do you keep your tires inflated to?

Some additional advice: When you bring your MKZ in for service, do not just tell the Service Advisor what you don't like about the ride/handling, hand them the keys and leave. Instead, ask to have the Service Advisor or atech take a ride with you so you can demonstrate what you are feeling. If you can get them to feel it too, you've won half the battle of getting it properly diagnosed and corrected.

Let us know how you make out and good luck.
 
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JWR

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Hi jhnjohnp. The MKZ's Lincoln Ride Control also incorporates a CCD suspension (Continuously Controlled Damping). The CCD suspeniosn continuously adjust the suspension in response to suspension, steering and braking sensors.

Here is a quick overview:
"The Lincoln Continuously Controlled Damping system in facts

CCD offers three modes (sport, normal, comfort) that are accessible using the Driver Information Center and controls on the steering wheel. It uses a suite of sensors that constantly monitor the vehicle’s suspension motion, body movement, steering and braking. The algorithm uses data from these sensors to adjust the suspension damping in milliseconds to help keep the body of the vehicle quiet and on track:
  • CCD system monitors 46 inputs that provide real-time data
  • CCD suspension reads 46 inputs every two milliseconds
  • CCD suspension reacts on average within 20 milliseconds
  • CCD has 12 sensors that speed-read the road to adjust the suspension
  • Each wheel/shock responds independently of the other three, allowing it to tailor its action to the specific condition it’s dealing with
  • The system allows for near-infinite variability of suspension response
  • CCD slows sudden changes in motion
  • CCD helps to reduce roll, pitch and vertical velocities
  • CCD enhances driving comfort and dynamics by adjusting damping force for each individual wheel
  • CCD helps isolate vehicle from undesired road harshness"
Hope this information helps. and good luck.
No doubt you are correct. And what that means is that no one can EVER debug the system and you stand no chance of ever fining the true problem.
 

JWR

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Hi jhnjohnp. The MKZ's Lincoln Ride Control also incorporates a CCD suspension (Continuously Controlled Damping). The CCD suspeniosn continuously adjust the suspension in response to suspension, steering and braking sensors.

Here is a quick overview:
"The Lincoln Continuously Controlled Damping system in facts

CCD offers three modes (sport, normal, comfort) that are accessible using the Driver Information Center and controls on the steering wheel. It uses a suite of sensors that constantly monitor the vehicle’s suspension motion, body movement, steering and braking. The algorithm uses data from these sensors to adjust the suspension damping in milliseconds to help keep the body of the vehicle quiet and on track:
  • CCD system monitors 46 inputs that provide real-time data
  • CCD suspension reads 46 inputs every two milliseconds
  • CCD suspension reacts on average within 20 milliseconds
  • CCD has 12 sensors that speed-read the road to adjust the suspension
  • Each wheel/shock responds independently of the other three, allowing it to tailor its action to the specific condition it’s dealing with
  • The system allows for near-infinite variability of suspension response
  • CCD slows sudden changes in motion
  • CCD helps to reduce roll, pitch and vertical velocities
  • CCD enhances driving comfort and dynamics by adjusting damping force for each individual wheel
  • CCD helps isolate vehicle from undesired road harshness"
Hope this information helps. and good luck.
I have no doubt you are correct. I also have no doubt that the real meaning is it cannot be debugged and the owner is stuck with a damnable pebble sensor for an otherwise very nice car. I just put 5000 miles on mine in Sept. -- beautiful trip car except for this stupid road imperfection sensing and magification. Once I had to stop and go around the car inspecting for what I feared was a flat tire. That all went away a mile later. Someone needs to be hung for putting problems like this in such an otherwise good car.
 

bbf2530

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I have no doubt you are correct. I also have no doubt that the real meaning is it cannot be debugged and the owner is stuck with a damnable pebble sensor for an otherwise very nice car. I just put 5000 miles on mine in Sept. -- beautiful trip car except for this stupid road imperfection sensing and magification. Once I had to stop and go around the car inspecting for what I feared was a flat tire. That all went away a mile later. Someone needs to be hung for putting problems like this in such an otherwise good car.
Hi JWR. You are the OP (for those who did not read the thread from the beginning) and have not posted back for ~1 year now. What was your final outcome? Was anything ever fixed/repaired, changed etc?

Larger diameter wheels (19" in this case) are definitely part of the problem with ride harshness issues nowadays. But larger wheels on today's cars are due to customer demand, since most people feel they "look better". Ironically, many of those same people think that larger diameter wheels are "race car wheels", when the opposite is true. "Race cars" do not use large diameter wheels, since they increase unsprung weight and are detrimental to better handling. Plus, they need shorter sidewall ratio tires to fit, which means less tire sidewall to absorb bumps and road imperfections. Thus, we have this thread about harsh ride. Larger diameter wheels do not help handling or ride, in fact, they are bad for both.

I realize this is not news to many people here, but it is good information for those interested and wondering.

Let us know what your outcome was and good luck.
______________________________
 

JWR

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The final outcome was that Lincoln cust serv became involved, tires were replaced (by me at the dealer at a discount) , they were rebalanced multiple times and we drove the disease into the least troublesome state we could. The dealer was never able to find anything wrong after many attempts. The larger diameter wheels are NOT a problem per se. The definite problem overlying gawd knows what all other problems is the short sidewalls of these 40 series tires, typical of racing tires regardless of diameter. People with the same body style Lincolns report much less pavement sensitivity who have 17 inch tires, not because of diameter, but because of the series being 55 or 60 or something far more sane than 40 series short sidewalls. In summary this car is a great vehicle in every way except that it is hypersensitive to road surface. There has been no cure and there will never be one. I know the short sidewalls are PART of the problem but do not expect to ever find a cure nor what the rest of the problem is.
 

jhnjohnp

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Hi jhnjohnp. You purchased your 2016 MKZ in June with 43,000 miles on it. How much time and miles are left on your 4 year/50,000 mile Bumper to Bumper warranty? You are not happy with the ride and feel something is wrong, so why not make an appointment so any issues can be diagnosed and serviced before the warranty expires, instead of guessing what the dealer can and can't do or what their "response will be"?

It is entirely possible something was wrong with the car when you purchased it and the previous owner never addressed it either. Could be as simple as a broken or defective shock/shocks due to something that happened while the previous owner had the car.

Also, what PSI do you keep your tires inflated to?

Some additional advice: When you bring your MKZ in for service, do not just tell the Service Advisor what you don't like about the ride/handling, hand them the keys and leave. Instead, ask to have the Service Advisor or atech take a ride with you so you can demonstrate what you are feeling. If you can get them to feel it too, you've won half the battle of getting it properly diagnosed and corrected.

Let us know how you make out and good luck.
OK, will do. Dropped by the dealer a month or 2 ago and was not impressed with his concern over the issue. Also had a leak in my trunk which I pin pointed to them, and they failed to correct it. Had to do it myself by placing a piece of weather stripping under the trunk gasket to raise it a bit, and no more leak. Been driving for some 57 years, and do most of my own maint. from replacing head gaskets on down. My experience with dealer service over the years has been mostly negative, however will keep you advzd.
 

bbf2530

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The final outcome was that Lincoln cust serv became involved, tires were replaced (by me at the dealer at a discount) , they were rebalanced multiple times and we drove the disease into the least troublesome state we could. The dealer was never able to find anything wrong after many attempts. The larger diameter wheels are NOT a problem per se. The definite problem overlying gawd knows what all other problems is the short sidewalls of these 40 series tires, typical of racing tires regardless of diameter. People with the same body style Lincolns report much less pavement sensitivity who have 17 inch tires, not because of diameter, but because of the series being 55 or 60 or something far more sane than 40 series short sidewalls. In summary this car is a great vehicle in every way except that it is hypersensitive to road surface. There has been no cure and there will never be one. I know the short sidewalls are PART of the problem but do not expect to ever find a cure nor what the rest of the problem is.
Hi JWR. I agree 100% that lower sidewall ratio tires are apples-to-apples rougher and harsher riding/driving than higher sidewall ratio tires, that is well known.

However, if you re-read my previous post, you will see I was addressing both the lower sidewall ratio tires and larger diameter wheels on current cars. Both are the problem and they go hand-in-hand. Larger diameter wheels are a fashion statement, not a handling enhancement. And without the demand and introduction of larger diameter, fashion statement wheels, we would not be stuck with shorter sidewall ratio tires.

And like shorter sidewall ratio tires, larger diameter wheels do contribute to a rougher ride due to increased unsprung weight hampering the suspensions ability to isolate the passenger compartment from vibration and harshness. They can not be separated from each other. That is what makes them both part of the problem. This is a well known issue.

Larger diameter wheels force the use of lower sidewall ratio tires, to allow the tire and wheel can fit in the limited wheelwell space. It is a lower sidewall ratio tire and larger diameter tire problem. Without larger diameter factory wheels, we would not need or have shorter sidewall tires from the factory. They go hand in hand.

Full disclosure: I own two MKZ's. One is a 2007 MKZ with 17" wheels and 225/50-17 tires. The other is a 2018 MKZ 3.0T AWD with the Drivers Package, 19" wheels and 245/40-19 tires.
I am lucky and do not have ride issues. My 2018 with 19"/40 series tires rides as I would expect it to ride, as compared to the 2007 with 17"/50 series tires. A little more sensitive in some aspects due to the larger wheels and shorter tires, but much smoother and quieter overall than the 2007, due to the CCD suspension and 11 years newer technology.

Something else that can help minimize/mitigate rough ride issues (but admittedly will not solve the problem): With the larger diameter wheels/shorter sidewall tires on current vehicles, we all need to check our tire pressures more regularly than in the past. There is less margin for error with tire pressures. Higher or lower than recommended pressures (as per the drivers door jamb plate) will cause rougher riding and harshness issues more quickly and readily than in the past. And recommended pressures are another new issue brought up by this, as my 2018 MKZ requires 38 PSI, versus my 2007's 33 PSI requirement. So a higher pressure requirement means a slightly rougher ride, apples to apples. Again, due to the larger wheels, shorter sidewall tires. Each small added factor creates a larger issue.

As I said, I fully agree with you that shorter sidewall tires help to create this problem. So I am not arguing, only providing additional information.

Hope that makes my replies clearer. Good luck.
 
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jhnjohnp

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Yes low profile tires will increase ride harshness, but don't believe they are responsible for my 2016 MKZ's inconsistent ride which ranges from a fairly stable ride to just acceptable, and at it's worst the feel of a fishing float. I believe the link below illustrates how Lincoln's Ride Control was designed to perform.

______________________________
 

bbf2530

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Hi jhnjohn. Not saying tires are responsible for your issues. Like most threads, this discussion has taken off in several directions related to sometimes rougher/harsher rides in current cars.

However, that YouTube link is outdated. It does not represent very well how our Lincoln suspension works.

Your answer is to take your car in for service and proper diagnosis, before your warranty expires. This can not be diagnosed over the Internet.

And to address your statement further above that you "Dropped by the dealer a month or 2 ago and was not impressed with his concern over the issue." Who did you speak to? Your salesperson? A Service Advisor? Someone else? Your Salesperson will likely know little about service needs. And people "drop by" Service Departments all the time. Until you make an appointment and leave your vehicle for proper diagnosis and service, it may seem like they are not showing much concern. Perhaps they could have been better in your case, I was not there. However, they know better than to guess and say it might be this or that, because many customers will then throw that guess back at them later. I am not defending it, but it is a fact of life in some/many cases. As far as your trunk leak, did you actually leave it there for them to diagnose? Your post above was not clear about that.

Bottom line? You need to make a Service appointment and have your car looked at, instead of guessing how the Adaptive Suspension works. And follow the advice you have been given above about taking the tech or Service Advisor for a test drive etc, before giving them the keys and leaving.

Let us know how you make out and good luck.
 
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jhnjohnp

Member
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Hi jhnjohn. Not saying tires are responsible for your issues. Like most threads, this discussion has taken off in several directions related to sometimes rougher/harsher rides in current cars.

However, that YouTube link is outdated. It does not represent very well how our Lincoln suspension works.

Your answer is to take your car in for service and proper diagnosis, before your warranty expires. This can not be diagnosed over the Internet.

And to address your statement further above that you "Dropped by the dealer a month or 2 ago and was not impressed with his concern over the issue." Who did you speak to? Your salesperson? A Service Advisor? Someone else? Your Salesperson will likely know little about service needs. And people "drop by" Service Departments all the time. Until you make an appointment and leave your vehicle for proper diagnosis and service, it may seem like they are not showing much concern. Perhaps they could have been better in your case, I was not there. However, they know better than to guess and say it might be this or that, because many customers will then throw that guess back at them later. I am not defending it, but it is a fact of life in some/many cases. As far as your trunk leak, did you actually leave it there for them to diagnose? Your post above was not clear about that.

Bottom line? You need to make a Service appointment and have your car looked at, instead of guessing how the Adaptive Suspension works. And follow the advice you have been given above about taking the tech or Service Advisor for a test drive etc, before giving them the keys and leaving.

Let us know how you make out and good luck.
I agree the Bose video was out dated, but still pertinent, considering that's something close to what Lincoln Ride Control is supposed to address? As far as the trunk leak goes I trouble shot the issue with a garden hose, made an appointment with Lincoln service, showed the service rep. the exact location of the leak, and still they failed to correct the problem. Mean while, with a small piece of weather stripping placed under the trunk seal, I stopped it. It was the service dept. I visited again, spoke to a service rep about my ride control concern, he was somewhat dismissive, and immediately raised the possibility of the 19 inch wheel being an issue. So unless tires dramatically affect the ride day to day, or even hour to hour, I'm not buying that. Installing wheels that don't complement the suspension? One other thing, the car came with two tires mfg. 2015, one 2016, and one 2017. Guess the car had a couple of tire failures. Tire placement as fol. Left front 2015, right front 2017, left rear 2015, and right rear 2016. I'm no rocket scientist, but do believe tire age and mileage may affect tire roll and deflection. Presently running with the 2015's at rear and newer tires up front. Couple that with standing water in the trunk, a lazy right side mirror which I managed to correct, I'm some what under impressed with Lincoln's CPO 200 points of inspection by factory-trained technicians. No hard feelings, will make an appointment for the ride control issue, hope for the best, and will keep you informed.
 
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jhnjohnp

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Hi jhnjohnp. The MKZ's Lincoln Ride Control also incorporates a CCD suspension (Continuously Controlled Damping). The CCD suspeniosn continuously adjust the suspension in response to suspension, steering and braking sensors.

Here is a quick overview:
"The Lincoln Continuously Controlled Damping system in facts

CCD offers three modes (sport, normal, comfort) that are accessible using the Driver Information Center and controls on the steering wheel. It uses a suite of sensors that constantly monitor the vehicle’s suspension motion, body movement, steering and braking. The algorithm uses data from these sensors to adjust the suspension damping in milliseconds to help keep the body of the vehicle quiet and on track:
  • CCD system monitors 46 inputs that provide real-time data
  • CCD suspension reads 46 inputs every two milliseconds
  • CCD suspension reacts on average within 20 milliseconds
  • CCD has 12 sensors that speed-read the road to adjust the suspension
  • Each wheel/shock responds independently of the other three, allowing it to tailor its action to the specific condition it’s dealing with
  • The system allows for near-infinite variability of suspension response
  • CCD slows sudden changes in motion
  • CCD helps to reduce roll, pitch and vertical velocities
  • CCD enhances driving comfort and dynamics by adjusting damping force for each individual wheel
  • CCD helps isolate vehicle from undesired road harshness"
Hope this information helps. and good luck.
Hello BBF. Just got off the phone with 3 Lincoln Dealers, and they claim all the ride control does on the MKZ is change the damping of the shocks from comfort, normal, to sport. All three said no CCD involved, but that it was available on other Lincoln models. No insult intended, but I hope they are right and you are wrong, cause the system on my 2016 MKZ Hybrid is not performing any of the CCD functions you described. If that's the case I'm going to try swapping out the shocks. Been to the dealer, and they say no error code, no problem. Also, if they find no problem there is a service charge with the CPO warranty. My car is in the shop for a broken side view mirror, and presently renting a Cadillac XTS (Nice car) with a conventional suspension that performs much better than my MKZ in it's present state.
 

bbf2530

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Hello BBF. Just got off the phone with 3 Lincoln Dealers, and they claim all the ride control does on the MKZ is change the damping of the shocks from comfort, normal, to sport. All three said no CCD involved, but that it was available on other Lincoln models. No insult intended, but I hope they are right and you are wrong, cause the system on my 2016 MKZ Hybrid is not performing any of the CCD functions you described. If that's the case I'm going to try swapping out the shocks. Been to the dealer, and they say no error code, no problem. Also, if they find no problem there is a service charge with the CPO warranty. My car is in the shop for a broken side view mirror, and presently renting a Cadillac XTS (Nice car) with a conventional suspension that performs much better than my MKZ in it's present state.
Hi jhnjohn. Welcome back to the discussion after two+ months...lol
Well, if they answered your original question, they are wrong. Your original question on 9/8/19 was whether Lincoln Drive Control in the MKZ incorporates CCD. And the answer to that question is yes it does incorporate CCD, and they are incorrect.

The answer I gave you that same day, 9/8/19, was copied and pasted directly from the Lincoln MKZ pages on the Lincoln website. You already had the correct answer directly from Lincoln. You simply needed to go to the Lincoln website and read the features for the MKZ, which clearly state that Lincoln Ride Control in the MKZ incorporates CCD. That would make much more sense than calling three different dealerships and speaking to unknown individuals.

Now, perhaps your 2016 model is a lower trim level which does not have Lincoln Drive Control and therefore would not have CCD. I can't determine that over the Internet. However, MKZ models with Lincoln Drive Control have CCD. My 2018 MKZ Reserve model has Lincoln Drive Control and CCD.

As far as them saying, "...if they find no problem there is a service charge": Well isn't that convenient for them. Is this a Lincoln CPO or some vague Dealership CPO warranty? What is the charge? Who determines there is no problem just because there is no code? Sounds like they just do not want to deal with the vehicle they sold you. Ask them to show you where that mystery charge policy is specified in the warranty booklet.

And were you still within the 4 year/50,000 New Car Bumper to Bumper Warranty when you first posted your question? I asked that last year and do not recall seeing an answer. You were well below 50,000 miles. Did you take your car in while it was still under the Bumper to Bumper Warranty? There is no such charge under the Bumper to Bumper Warranty.

To be clear...I am not asking you or anyone else to believe me. I am asking you to believe the official information and statements from Lincoln, which I posted back in September, and which can be easily verified from Lincoln (not anonymous Dealership people), by anyone who wants to know the correct answer.

And again, ask the Dealership to show you where a charge is determined if they say they can not find a problem.

There are a lot of unanswered questions, but one this is sure: Lincoln Drive Control in the MKZ incorporates CCD. The question would be whether your 2016 MKZ model trim level has Lincoln Drive Control.

Hope you can get the right answers from your Dealership Service Department when you ask them again. And I hope you can have your concerns resolved so you can be happy with your MKZ. Keep us updated and good luck.
______________________________
 
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JWR

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Interesting to see a revival of the thread that I started in 2016. The guarantee (bumper to bumper) on my 2013 MKZ AWD ran out this past Sept. The extended guarantee runs out in 25 days. My dealer investigated the problem several times and NEVER once hinted at it costing me anything. Lincoln cust serv people got involved and had tires balanced several times, and caused repeated dealer investigations. None of that solved the problem. The service depts have no real way to get deep into this problem -- they attach test gear that tells them the shocks are working Yes/No and that is the end of it. I put $1000 worth of new Michelins on it year before last which changed nothing.

There is one pure, simple, fact: This vehicle is hypersensitive to road surfaces. I have found stretches of road very smooth which proves it has nothing to do with tire balancing and other such factors. Today I had my service rep at the dealer drive the car because he too owns one. He sees little/no difference between mine and his.

Obviously from the posts in this thread MANY MKZ owners have "the problem" and just as obviously no one accessible to us knows what the problem is or how to fix it. After all this expended effort the practical answer is: That is the nature of the beast. Nothing you can do.
 

jhnjohnp

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Hi jhnjohn. Welcome back to the discussion after two+ months...lol
Well, if they answered your original question, they are wrong. Your original question on 9/8/19 was whether Lincoln Drive Control in the MKZ incorporates CCD. And the answer to that question is yes it does incorporate CCD, and they are incorrect.

The answer I gave you that same day, 9/8/19, was copied and pasted directly from the Lincoln MKZ pages on the Lincoln website. You already had the correct answer directly from Lincoln. You simply needed to go to the Lincoln website and read the features for the MKZ, which clearly state that Lincoln Ride Control in the MKZ incorporates CCD. That would make much more sense than calling three different dealerships and speaking to unknown individuals.

Now, perhaps your 2016 model is a lower trim level which does not have Lincoln Drive Control and therefore would not have CCD. I can't determine that over the Internet. However, MKZ models with Lincoln Drive Control have CCD. My 2018 MKZ Reserve model has Lincoln Drive Control and CCD.

As far as them saying, "...if they find no problem there is a service charge": Well isn't that convenient for them. Is this a Lincoln CPO or some vague Dealership CPO warranty? What is the charge? Who determines there is no problem just because there is no code? Sounds like they just do not want to deal with the vehicle they sold you. Ask them to show you where that mystery charge policy is specified in the warranty booklet.

And were you still within the 4 year/50,000 New Car Bumper to Bumper Warranty when you first posted your question? I asked that last year and do not recall seeing an answer. You were well below 50,000 miles. Did you take your car in while it was still under the Bumper to Bumper Warranty? There is no such charge under the Bumper to Bumper Warranty.

To be clear...I am not asking you or anyone else to believe me. I am asking you to believe the official information and statements from Lincoln, which I posted back in September, and which can be easily verified from Lincoln (not anonymous Dealership people), by anyone who wants to know the correct answer.

And again, ask the Dealership to show you where a charge is determined if they say they can not find a problem.

There are a lot of unanswered questions, but one this is sure: Lincoln Drive Control in the MKZ incorporates CCD. The question would be whether your 2016 MKZ model trim level has Lincoln Drive Control.

Hope you can get the right answers from your Dealership Service Department when you ask them again. And I hope you can have your concerns resolved so you can be happy with your MKZ. Keep us updated and good luck.
I stand corrected, the three dealers I spoke to misinformed me, the 2016 MKZ does have Lincoln Drive Control with adaptive suspension, and I do believe the existence of the official information from Lincoln you posted. Looks good on paper, but in my case that's about it.
 

jhnjohnp

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Just got off the phone with the service dept. of Hassett Lincoln, Wantagh, NY. Spoke to Alex one of the service advisors, real gentleman I might add, and he explained with the CPO extended warranty (6 yrs. 100,000 miles) there is a $100.00 deductible, and a $140.00 an hour diagnostic fee per visit. Of course if trouble is found diagnostic fee will be applied toward fix, but if no trouble I'm still liable for the deductible and diagnostic fee which is determined by time spent on trouble shooting.
 
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bbf2530

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Just got off the phone with the service dept. of Hassett Lincoln, Wantagh, NY. Spoke to Alex one of the service advisors, real gentleman I might add, and he explained with the CPO extended warranty (6 yrs. 100,000 miles) there is a $100.00 deductible, and a $140.00 an hour diagnostic fee per visit. Of course if trouble is found diagnostic fee will be applied toward fix, but if no trouble I'm still liable for the deductible and diagnostic fee which is determined by time spent on trouble shooting. In closing I would like to add the partial post of another member of this forum.

Obviously from the posts in this thread MANY MKZ owners have "the problem" and just as obviously no one accessible to us knows what the problem is or how to fix it. After all this expended effort the practical answer is: That is the nature of the beast. Nothing you can do.
Hi jhnjohn. Please call Lincoln Customer Service or Lincoln Concierge for your information. Tell them what these dealers are telling you about your Lincoln Certified CPO. You are getting a lot of bad information from your local dealers. All of which will somehow manage to extract more money out of your pocket than you should pay in the future.

Yes, there is a $100 deductible for each visit under the Lincoln CPO. That is stated in the Warranty information. However, there are no diagnostic fees. That is what the deductible covers.

That may be where some of our earlier confusion came from. You were stating, "...if they find no problem there is a service charge". That was confusing. There is never a "service charge" if they do not find an issue. There is simply a $100 deductible for each visit. No diagnostic fees.

Good luck.

EDIT - Just an FYI, to avoid confusion for those coming into this thread late: We are discussing the Lincoln CPO (Certified Pre-Owned) Warranty. Not the Lincoln New Car Bumper to Bumper or Powertrain Warranties. Those new vehicle warranties have no deductibles.
______________________________
 
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jhnjohnp

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Hi jhnjohn. Please call Lincoln Customer Service or Lincoln Concierge for your information. Tell them what these dealers are telling you about your Lincoln Certified CPO. You are getting a lot of bad information from your local dealers. All of which will somehow manage to extract more money out of your pocket than you should pay in the future.
er
Yes, there is a $100 deductible for each visit under the Lincoln CPO. That is stated in the Warranty information. However, there are no diagnostic fees. That is what the deductible covers.

That may be where some of our earlier confusion came from. You were stating, "...if they find no problem there is a service charge". That was confusing. There is never a "service charge" if they do not find an issue. There is simply a $100 deductible for each visit. No diagnostic fees.

Good luck.

EDIT - Just an FYI, to avoid confusion for those coming into this thread late: We are discussing the Lincoln CPO (Certified Pre-Owned) Warranty. Not the Lincoln New Car Bumper to Bumper or Powertrain Warranties. Those new vehicle warranties have no deductibles.
OK, will do. Also, to be fair, the car is not a total disaster, just think ride and steering could be better. Had asked the service people if the ride control module/modules could be rebooted or reflashed, like deleting and reinstalling a corrupt program on you computer. They didn't express much interest. What do you think about disconnecting the negative battery cable overnight to reset the systems? One of the service reps. suggested this.
 

JWR

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I would love to find a way to disconnect the electrical connections to all 4 needlessly complex shock absorbers. Driving the car around a day or two with those disconnected would prove whether or not this hypersensitivity to road surface problem is a malfunction of the shock control system or something else.
 

bbf2530

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OK, will do. Also, to be fair, the car is not a total disaster, just think ride and steering could be better. Had asked the service people if the ride control module/modules could be rebooted or reflashed, like deleting and reinstalling a corrupt program on you computer. They didn't express much interest. What do you think about disconnecting the negative battery cable overnight to reset the systems? One of the service reps. suggested this.
Hi jhnjohn. Although I don't normally advocate disconnecting the battery as an immediate go-to for addressing issues (because it's often just a temporary band-aid), it couldn't hurt in this case. If you disconnect and see a ride quality difference, that would certainly point to there being some sort of issue.

Keep us updated and good luck.
 
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jhnjohnp

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Hi jhnjohn. Although I don't normally advocate disconnecting the battery as an immediate go-to for addressing issues (because it's often just a temporary band-aid), it couldn't hurt in this case. If you disconnect and see a ride quality difference, that would certainly point to there being some sort of issue.

Keep us updated and good luck.
OK. Was hoping for a mechanical issue, strut/shock which I can address, but the squirrely steering (car veers left, straight ahead, to the right randomly) indicates whatever just don't know. Also, sort of in a dilemma here, if the diagnostic fee is some sort of scam, how can I trust these people to repair the car. Will advz.
 
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