The New Lincoln Continental is Beautiful, Powerful and Front Wheel Drive

News Man

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The new Lincoln Continental made its production earlier this week at the 2016 Detroit Auto Show and with that debut comes more of the vital information including features, the engine lineup and the fact that this large luxury sedan has stuck with the front-wheel drive configuration that most luxury automakers have left behind.



While a great many journalists jump on the chance to bag on the Lincoln brand, I like both the brand’s current styling and the direction in which they are headed. Sure, Lincoln doesn’t compete with Cadillac in terms of sales figures, but from the MKC to the MKZ, I like Lincoln.

When the Lincoln Continental Concept was introduced at the New York Auto Show last year, I was impressed with the car inside and out, but I had to wonder how much of that concept would make it to production. Lincoln stated at the Continental Concept launch that it was destined for production, but could Lincoln really sell a car as impressive as that concept?

The New Lincoln Continental is Beautiful, Powerful and Front Wheel Drive
 

mark95man

Senior Member
These cars are NOT selling too well and stacked up in Dealers lots. Ford is closing some plants. The vehicle models affected include the Ford Fusion and Lincoln MKZ midsize sedans, the Ford Focus compact car, the Lincoln Continental and Ford Mustang, Ford Fiesta and the Ford Transit van.
 

Administrator

Lincoln Fanatic
Staff member
These cars are NOT selling too well and stacked up in Dealers lots. Ford is closing some plants. The vehicle models affected include the Ford Fusion and Lincoln MKZ midsize sedans, the Ford Focus compact car, the Lincoln Continental and Ford Mustang, Ford Fiesta and the Ford Transit van.
Why do you think the Fusions aren't selling? I don't see many 2017s but I see a lot of every other year. I see MKZs but not a whole lot. I don't see many Continentals...
 

Town

Senior Member
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Ottawa Ontario Canada
When I look at the sales figures (up to August 2017) for the Continental I don't see the same issues as reported above. Manufacturers have always adjusted production to sales reality. The Continental is selling 1,000 a month on average this calendar year and ahead of Cadillac CT6 at 770 per month. Sales in July and August for both cars slowed to 800-900 cars a month. It seems that all model sales drop in the summer, even the mighty S class at 500 cars sold in August. So it would appear the 2017 and 2018 Continentals with their incredible capability are selling better than can be expected for expensive cars. By far the best Lincoln on the market. Even the Navigator sales for 2017 are way behind the Continental at 6,484 for 2017, just an average sales of 810 per month.

It is a pity that comments on news about the Continental is so slanted.
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mark95man

Senior Member
RE: "Even the Navigator sales for 2017 are way behind the Continental at 6,484 for 2017, just an average sales of 810 per month." As a new vehicle purchaser, Lincoln screwed the Navigator with making that V-6 EcoBoost the only engine available. Remember currently that V-6 has head carbon issues that are not being addressed until the 2018 models are made. They should have made a V-8 available as in the F-250 or the V-8 that was available in the F-150 last year.

Why do I feel this way? I was there for the reintroduction of FWD in the late 1970's. It would be cheaper to build and repair the cars–REALLY? In snow with a skid, the cars would head off in the direction of their front tires when traction was regained—usually off the road until traction control came into being/installed. And then we had the costly failure of the rubber boots on the front half shafts. I remember the turbo-boosted engines-more power with less problems–REALLY? How about the coking issue on the turbo’s bearings? Or today's V-6 EcoBoost engine with carbon issues. Anyone here remember the Chevrolet 350 V-8 that Oldsmobile made into a diesel engine? They removed them and replaced the whole drive train and fuel system with a gasoline engine 350 V-8. Then there was the infamous Cadillac 4-6-8 V-8 engine. That too was pulled and replaced with a standard V-8. Then some had oil or anti-freeze issues that required a recall. In short my trust in auto companies is very low. For me the new Continental is just a bigger unibody Ford Fusion.
 

Administrator

Lincoln Fanatic
Staff member
For me the new Continental is just a bigger unibody Ford Fusion.
This practice is becoming more and more common. Even the almighty 7-Series BMW shares it's platform with the 5-Series. And if you watch the BMW forums you'll find many of the typical BMW loyalists angry that BMW isn't making the "ultimate driving machine" anymore. In any event, sometimes it takes a while for a new car to catch on and I have a feeling the Continental is one of those vehicles. There weren't many Genesis sedans at first but now they've spawned a new luxury division at Hyundai and renamed Genesis G80.

There are plenty of things that aren't great about today's new cars but they also have plenty of innovations and great aspects that were not a part of yesterday's cars...
 

Town

Senior Member
4,399
129
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Ottawa Ontario Canada
RE: "Even the Navigator sales for 2017 are way behind the Continental at 6,484 for 2017, just an average sales of 810 per month." As a new vehicle purchaser, Lincoln screwed the Navigator with making that V-6 EcoBoost the only engine available. Remember currently that V-6 has head carbon issues that are not being addressed until the 2018 models are made. They should have made a V-8 available as in the F-250 or the V-8 that was available in the F-150 last year.

Why do I feel this way? I was there for the reintroduction of FWD in the late 1970's. It would be cheaper to build and repair the cars–REALLY? In snow with a skid, the cars would head off in the direction of their front tires when traction was regained—usually off the road until traction control came into being/installed. And then we had the costly failure of the rubber boots on the front half shafts. I remember the turbo-boosted engines-more power with less problems–REALLY? How about the coking issue on the turbo’s bearings? Or today's V-6 EcoBoost engine with carbon issues. Anyone here remember the Chevrolet 350 V-8 that Oldsmobile made into a diesel engine? They removed them and replaced the whole drive train and fuel system with a gasoline engine 350 V-8. Then there was the infamous Cadillac 4-6-8 V-8 engine. That too was pulled and replaced with a standard V-8. Then some had oil or anti-freeze issues that required a recall. In short my trust in auto companies is very low. For me the new Continental is just a bigger unibody Ford Fusion.
The valve fouling on the old V6 twin turbo is due to the crankcase ventilation system putting oil vapours from the crankcase up into the intake where the fumes cause carbon to be attached to the underside of the valve heads and stems leading to misfires. This is caused from oil not up to the job and poor quality gas and infrequent engine oil changes for the type of driving done. Much less highway and more short trips than recommended change intervals. Also the misfires from too large spark plug gaps not working properly on Direct Injection (DI) engines. The newer V6 twin turbo engines are much better. Every time a new technology is introduced there are teething problems, sometimes design issues and sometimes owner issues. The concept is a winner since you have unbelievable power and unbelievably good economy, just not at the same time. But being prudent with the throttle gives very good performance and great fuel economy. The turbo generation is with us, whether we like it or not, so just enjoy it, I sure am.

Front wheel drive was introduced to improve the amount of room inside the vehicle compared to the exterior size. And it does that. The FWD allowed an engine and transmission package that further improved the space available for passengers and has proved a reliable package. In all early technology applications there are issues that the engineers need to rectify, and they have done that. Driving a car involves matching your performance expectations to the circumstances which include weather issues. So the idea that a FWD is somehow inferior to a RWD is utter nonsense. A FWD is inherently more stable than a RWD. If you don't know how to drive a car in difficult circumstances then you will have problems regardless of the type of drivetrain. A FWD will start off better than a RWD for the same driver, while turning a corner a FWD is more intuitive than a RWD since you usually just add additional steering movement, instead of heading into the ditch backwards. An experienced driver will know the limitations of each drivetrain and drive accordingly and safely without much skidding around.

Unibody is another approach to improve the interior space relative to the exterior dimensions. For a car it is perfect and much stronger and less flexible than a body on frame. The separate body and frame is preferred by the towing crowd because it can be upgraded to match payload and towing loads. The new Continental is a unibody car and it is based upon the Fusion, and what a great starting point. However there was a great deal of engineering to make the architecture much larger and much stronger. But you have to look below the surface to see the differences. Even on the surface you see the upgrades all through the car in terms of equipment and features and technology. Lincoln engineers turned a great car into an unbelievable one that competes on the world stage with all the big names, and wins.

All through the automotive age engineers have pushed the boundaries and in so doing have made mistakes. Criticising their efforts is not appropriate since we all make mistakes. Certain advances are recognised as a major direction change and improvement.

Good luck in your misery of always re-living the mistakes, rather than the major advances that caused them.
 

mark95man

Senior Member
RE: "Good luck in your misery of always re-living the mistakes, rather than the major advances that caused them." Who was it that said, those who forget the past will relive it? My mistakes, I pay for. Purchasing something with other's mistakes is something you may do.
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Administrator

Lincoln Fanatic
Staff member
I love the designs of old cars and I love the "living room" like size they offered - but I appreciate new technology too much to drive them anymore. To each his own. There's no right or wrong for the individual. The choice is up to them. For me, I'd much rather be in a 2017 Continental than any other Lincoln before hand. Style-wise, hell, hands down I'd take a 1979 Lincoln Continental over anything available today. But the comfort and luxury amenities offered by today's Continental just can't be beat...

 

American Luxury

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Navigator sales are not low because of the Ecoboost V6. Sales are low because it's been updated once in 11 years and the platform it rides on has been around longer than that. Expect sales to be higher next year. Saying the Continental is just a big Fusion is just like saying the Town Car is a big Crown Victoria. Yes, there are similarities, but the Continental is its own car.
 

Administrator

Lincoln Fanatic
Staff member
Navigator sales are not low because of the Ecoboost V6. Sales are low because it's been updated once in 11 years and the platform it rides on has been around longer than that. Expect sales to be higher next year. Saying the Continental is just a big Fusion is just like saying the Town Car is a big Crown Victoria. Yes, there are similarities, but the Continental is its own car.
I agree and I hear that all the time about various cars. The Lexus LS is a Toyota Camry. What?! Seriously?! But even a more sensible comparison like you mentioned, Town Car vs Crown Victoria or Mercury Grand Marquis - especially with the Mercury. They were so similar. But the Town Car had a presence that neither the Ford nor Mercury had. Plus a few extras. That leather for one...
 

mark95man

Senior Member
I would agree that the decontented 2011 Town Car just wouldn't sell in today's market. HOWEVER, if Lincoln had continued to upgrade it by installing new technology, things might be different. Darn, you couldn't even get a factory moonroof or air springs in the last few years. The one thing many cannot knock is the MPG it delivered as a body on full frame, RWD with a V-8. When I look at the current crop of new "large" cars, I see less MPG, less interior room & small trunk without room for a full size spare tire. My wife purchased a new 2014 MKZH that was EPA rated at over 40 MPG until Ford admitted fraud in that rating. Ford should have purchased those vehicles back! The main reason she wanted a MKZH was MPG. For those of us who actually work on their vehicles, just changing the oil on the MKZ is a P.I.A. + body repair is extremely costly when done as per factory specs. Our Corvettes were easier to work on! I was hoping the 2018 Navigator would lose the claimed weight of 700 pounds---but even that fell to 200 pounds. Just my buying opinions.
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Administrator

Lincoln Fanatic
Staff member
I would agree that the decontented 2011 Town Car just wouldn't sell in today's market. HOWEVER, if Lincoln had continued to upgrade it by installing new technology, things might be different. Darn, you couldn't even get a factory moonroof or air springs in the last few years. The one thing many cannot knock is the MPG it delivered as a body on full frame, RWD with a V-8. When I look at the current crop of new "large" cars, I see less MPG, less interior room & small trunk without room for a full size spare tire. My wife purchased a new 2014 MKZH that was EPA rated at over 40 MPG until Ford admitted fraud in that rating. Ford should have purchased those vehicles back! The main reason she wanted a MKZH was MPG. For those of us who actually work on their vehicles, just changing the oil on the MKZ is a P.I.A. + body repair is extremely costly when done as per factory specs. Our Corvettes were easier to work on! I was hoping the 2018 Navigator would lose the claimed weight of 700 pounds---but even that fell to 200 pounds. Just my buying opinions.
I was sad to see the Cadillac Fleetwood go but I was happy to see Lincoln continue on with the Town Car for as long as it did. The way I see things, and I know you won't agree with me, the new Continental is exactly what the Town Car would be today had it never died. What would be your perfect 2018 full-size luxury sedan if you could create one?
 

mark95man

Senior Member
I was sad to see the Cadillac Fleetwood go but I was happy to see Lincoln continue on with the Town Car for as long as it did. The way I see things, and I know you won't agree with me, the new Continental is exactly what the Town Car would be today had it never died. What would be your perfect 2018 full-size luxury sedan if you could create one?
Make the 2017 Continental a body on full frame with RWD with a V-8 lacking any boost equipment as you don't really need turbos when the base engine, with lower RPM's is enough. ANd of course it would have all the advanced equipment the Continental has. I would guess MPG would be in the range of what the old panther based vehicles gave. Other than that, another new Corvette could be in my future.

From my experience with my wife's 2014 MKZH--when new it was hit in the R/R quarter panel--appeared minor but.... An insurance company approved shop said a repair would be under $3,000--they would NOT explain repair. Since I knew what they were going to do--pull the panel out & fiberglass it--, we ran to a Ford Dealer where we had experience. To repair a unibody to factory standards, the R/R quarter panel had to be replaced and the unibody straightened--slightly out of specs. They removed the full sliding roof, side air bags, electronics hidden on the right side, front/rear windows and straightened the unibody to factory settings. + a factory "as built" computer download & side + rear warning sensor replaced. Total cost was just under $10,000 + no charge rental car. After 30,000 miles no issues at all + factory tires are still very good. If the MKZH had a body on full frame, the repairs would have been minor.
 

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