The 5.2 engine seems to be the better upgrade for the 2003-2011 Town Car

Captain O

Member
45
16
8
From what I can tell it isn't much larger than the 4.6 and it could, (with the proper fuel injection system) be just a bit less fuel-efficient than the 4.6 modular.

Comments? Opinions?
 

Captain O

Member
45
16
8
It's mighty hard to argue with the LS, and I'm not really a chevy guy. Been done by the crown vic kids.
By God, I believe you! If arrangements could be made to power all the accessories of the LincolnTown Car, a N/A 6.0 Liter Vortec with the appropriate 5-6 speed transmission (6th being an overdrive) would make for a smashing "Hot Rod Lincoln", wouldn't it?
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Russ T.

New member
28
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3
From what I can tell it isn't much larger than the 4.6 and it could, (with the proper fuel injection system) be just a bit less fuel-efficient than the 4.6 modular.

Comments? Opinions?
Up grade? The 4.6 may be the best engine Ford ever made. I just sold the last of my Limo Fleet, my 2005 had 436k and my 2010 had 336k miles and they never failed once and got 24-25 mpg on highway. Keep your 4.6 engines.
 

wolf_walker

Junior Member
463
278
63
5hp Briggs & Stratton is a fine motor as well, but unfulfilling trying to pull around a really fat guy on a heavy framed riding mower.
To put it another way, the current Toyota Sienna minivan has a thousand lbs less weight and 15 more hp.
Nobody is trying to go racing with one of them either, but having a little spare poke from time to time is
desirable, especially when the playing field has moved on so far.
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Brian J. Patterson

Well-known member
425
303
63
Northern Illinois
From what I can tell it isn't much larger than the 4.6 and it could, (with the proper fuel injection system) be just a bit less fuel-efficient than the 4.6 modular.

Comments? Opinions?

Hello, all.

Here's my "two cents" worth.

Your right foot is the greatest factor in how "fuel efficient" your car drives. If you value fuel economy that much, don't swap the engine at all. If you want more power, just "stay out of it" when you are trying to be "economical" and pay the difference.

While you're boosting the horsepower and torque, don't forget to "adjust" your suspension as well. You can "bump up" to limo air springs in the rear, or call Arnott and get something just a little bit stiffer without sacrificing the air-smooth Lincoln ride in the straights. Combined with the appropriate choices for front springs, roll bars, shocks, tires, rims, and so on, you can corner without feeling every pebble you drive over.

Any Modular Family V8 will swap into the '98-'11 Town Car with almost no difficulty, and can be persuaded to play nice with the PCM. But, choose wisely. Avoid any engine with variable camshaft timing. These engines are hypersensitive to oil passage clogging to the point that if you even say "late oil change" in the presence of one, it will send the top end into the oil pan. Ask any Ford or Lincoln truck owner who had the misfortune to buy one used.

The Cobra will "strike hard" off the line, and the Coyote will truly howl. With a good transmission behind them, they will be worth the effort, IMHO.

If you don't care for the Modular Family, a Windsor Engine just might be what you want. The outside engine dimensions are "close enough" that you can get one in without any major body or frame surgery. And, the Boss 351 is a good engine with a lot of potential.

Converting a Town Car to plug-in electric using Tesla components would be an interesting challenge. I would recommend using a Model S or X as the donor rather than a Model 3 or Y. The S-X series battery pack is much more "modular" than the Model 3-Y pack, making battery location less challenging. You could "easily" install a single motor in place of the FoMoCo transmission and retain the Lincoln axle and suspension, or transplant the S-X rear axle and motor assembly to the Lincoln frame. Of course, if you go that route, you might also replace the front axle as well, giving you a dual motor setup.

If you don't just keep the entire battery pack in its native housing and re-work the Lincoln floorpan, the S-X battery pack will allow you more "freedom" in locating the battery modules. You will want to make sure that all, or at least most of the modules are between the front and rear axle to avoid weight distribution issues. Going this route will also allow to a certain degree for you installing a higher battery system capacity, allowing you to offset the higher weight of the "remaining Lincoln" and still keep an acceptable range.

If you do keep the battery pack as made by Tesla, remember to fasten it to the frame and not the floorpan. You will want to offset the battery pack vertically and slightly, so that you minimize battery floorpan intrusion to the passenger compartment. Of course, since you are going that far otherwise by flattening the floor tunnel, you can adjust the floor pan a little bit if needed. Remember that your range between charges will be less than that of the donor Tesla because of the higher weight of the "remaining Lincoln" when compared with the "discarded Tesla."

Swapping in a GM or MoPar engine can be done, but that would be like going on a vacation to Maine and eating at Red Lobster while there, or going to Paris and ordering a bottle of California wine. If you want GM Luxury, start with a Cadillac. If you want MoPar Luxury, start with an Imperial. At least that's my two cents worth.

Good luck, and happy swapping.
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