Sound deadening for the undercarriage

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NautiOne

New member
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Arkansas
Read that this procedure can reduce cabin noise by 5dB. Cabin is already quiet; but what if it can be even be quieter?

Has anyone had their vehicle's undercarriage (and/or wheel wells) coated (either professionally or DIY) with a spray-on sound deadening material (3M, Lizard Skin, Rust-Oleum)?

Will this void the warranty?

Just curious. Thanks!
 

Black Label

SUPPORTING MEMBER
1,590
528
113
Burr Ridge, IL
Read that this procedure can reduce cabin noise by 5dB. Cabin is already quiet; but what if it can be even be quieter?

Has anyone had their vehicle's undercarriage (and/or wheel wells) coated (either professionally or DIY) with a spray-on sound deadening material (3M, Lizard Skin, Rust-Oleum)?

Will this void the warranty?

Just curious. Thanks!
Sounds to me like the old Scotch Guard or rust undercoating. I wouldn't do it. Smarter people may chime in, though.
 

enigma-2

Member
123
21
18
There have been a few individuals who have reported the use of Dynamat in the spare tire area, cargo area sidewalls and inside doors made a definite difference. It material deadens by stiffening the sheet metal panels where a drum effect exists.

Undercoating does little in quieting (does little to stiffen large metal panel surfaces) and adds possibility of trapping water between it and the metal; resulting in corrosion.

The first thing to consider is the source of road noise; your tires. Size, rubber type and tread pattern have a direct bearing how much noise is transmitted into the vehicle frame. Michelin and Perelli Scorpions are the quietest but they use solf rubber to achieve this and expect 20,000-25,000 before hard rubber kicks in and get noisy. Bridgestones are a little noisier but last much longer.
 
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