Remote features disabled to preserve battery

OldBrit

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Not all trickle chargers are the same, you need one with the right amps. There's a correlation between amps and time to full recharge, and if you have a trickle with less than 5 amp output chances are you're not getting enough juice in it, the Corsair has an 800 CCA battery to power up and run all that electrical stuff. You need at least 5 amps, and 10 would be fine especially if you drive infrequently and it gets very cold between drives.

I sound like an advert here, but this is the minimum you want: https://www.amazon.com/NOCO-GENIUS5-Fully-Automatic-Temperature-Compensation/dp/B07W8KJH44/ref=sr_1_5?crid=17K4W0GXY1T5M&dchild=1&keywords=trickle+charger&qid=1614810817&sprefix=trickle,aps,189&sr=8-5
No, Corsart, I have a Genius charger - a model G1100, and as it says on the box, it's "a wicked smart charger!" I can leave it connected for days without any worry of overcharging. The thing is, I would start out with a fully charged battery, take a quick trip to the store, and the next day find that the car has gone into the "save battery" mode again, which made me think that the battery had lost its charge overnight. Now I'm starting to wonder if the "save battery" mode is triggered not by the condition of the battery, but by the ambient temperature. It's starting to get a little warmer where I live and yesterday, at about +5C (41F), the welcoming lights greeted me as I walked up to the car, indicating that all was OK. I wonder if, when the temperature drops below a certain mark, maybe zero C (32F), the car goes into the "save battery" mode regardless of how much charge the battery has. I dunno. I'm going to take Marc's advice and buy a battery tester. Yet another tool that I'll use maybe once a year, but I live by the mantra "There is no such thing as too many tools!"
 

Marc

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No, Corsart, I have a Genius charger - a model G1100, and as it says on the box, it's "a wicked smart charger!" I can leave it connected for days without any worry of overcharging. The thing is, I would start out with a fully charged battery, take a quick trip to the store, and the next day find that the car has gone into the "save battery" mode again, which made me think that the battery had lost its charge overnight. Now I'm starting to wonder if the "save battery" mode is triggered not by the condition of the battery, but by the ambient temperature. It's starting to get a little warmer where I live and yesterday, at about +5C (41F), the welcoming lights greeted me as I walked up to the car, indicating that all was OK. I wonder if, when the temperature drops below a certain mark, maybe zero C (32F), the car goes into the "save battery" mode regardless of how much charge the battery has. I dunno. I'm going to take Marc's advice and buy a battery tester. Yet another tool that I'll use maybe once a year, but I live by the mantra "There is no such thing as too many tools!"
First you should make sure the alternator is ok. With a voltmeter you should read 12.4-12.6 volts across your battery posts and with the engine running voltage should go up to 13,7-13,9
 

Corsart

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No, Corsart, I have a Genius charger - a model G1100, and as it says on the box, it's "a wicked smart charger!" I can leave it connected for days without any worry of overcharging. The thing is, I would start out with a fully charged battery, take a quick trip to the store, and the next day find that the car has gone into the "save battery" mode again, which made me think that the battery had lost its charge overnight. Now I'm starting to wonder if the "save battery" mode is triggered not by the condition of the battery, but by the ambient temperature. It's starting to get a little warmer where I live and yesterday, at about +5C (41F), the welcoming lights greeted me as I walked up to the car, indicating that all was OK. I wonder if, when the temperature drops below a certain mark, maybe zero C (32F), the car goes into the "save battery" mode regardless of how much charge the battery has. I dunno. I'm going to take Marc's advice and buy a battery tester. Yet another tool that I'll use maybe once a year, but I live by the mantra "There is no such thing as too many tools!"
Yours is something else, then. Lacking information in the OP, I assume the easy stuff first, like the charger.

I spend weekends in Northern New England where the temps go down low, and haven't had an issue, so I this sounds like something other than the absolute ambient temp.
 

bbf2530

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No, Corsart, I have a Genius charger - a model G1100, and as it says on the box, it's "a wicked smart charger!" I can leave it connected for days without any worry of overcharging. The thing is, I would start out with a fully charged battery, take a quick trip to the store, and the next day find that the car has gone into the "save battery" mode again, which made me think that the battery had lost its charge overnight. Now I'm starting to wonder if the "save battery" mode is triggered not by the condition of the battery, but by the ambient temperature. It's starting to get a little warmer where I live and yesterday, at about +5C (41F), the welcoming lights greeted me as I walked up to the car, indicating that all was OK. I wonder if, when the temperature drops below a certain mark, maybe zero C (32F), the car goes into the "save battery" mode regardless of how much charge the battery has. I dunno. I'm going to take Marc's advice and buy a battery tester. Yet another tool that I'll use maybe once a year, but I live by the mantra "There is no such thing as too many tools!"

Hi OldBrit. Yes, ambient temperature is one of the factors taken into consideration when enabling battery saver mode.

A more detailed explanation is also contained in our Lincoln Way apps and Owner Manuals.

It is difficult to determine over the Internet whether your particular vehicle has an issue, but ambient temperatures are a factor in when battery saver mode is enabled.

Le us know how you make out and good luck..
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felixmendel

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Now that my battery is replaced, I don't get the annoying warning and the stop-start function works again. I do a lot of waiting in the car with the engine off due to covid while my wife goes into her medical appointments. One thing I notice is sounds from under the hood after about 10 minutes that sound like a solenoid or valve turning off. Sometimes I hear similar sounds multiple times for up to 30 minutes. Not sure what is happening.
 

bbf2530

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Now that my battery is replaced, I don't get the annoying warning and the stop-start function works again. I do a lot of waiting in the car with the engine off due to covid while my wife goes into her medical appointments. One thing I notice is sounds from under the hood after about 10 minutes that sound like a solenoid or valve turning off. Sometimes I hear similar sounds multiple times for up to 30 minutes. Not sure what is happening.

Hi felix. Happy to hear a new battery solved the problem.

While Internet diagnosis of noises we can not hear is obviously difficult, the noises you are describing are likely normal. For example...Accessory power turns off after 10 minutes (or when you open a door to get out). Other features, such as SYNC updating, turn off after 30 minutes.

Good luck.
 

felixmendel

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I just got a weird message from my 2020 Corsair. It is linked to my phone by bluetooth but I have not subscribed to the mobile hotspot service. It is at a body shop about 5 miles away getting repaired after some idiot hit me in a parking lot and did not leave their name. So the Corsair should not be communicating with the internet. Yet I just got two messages on my phone saying my car was going to sleep because of a low battery? How could the message be sent to me???
 

bbf2530

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I just got a weird message from my 2020 Corsair. It is linked to my phone by bluetooth but I have not subscribed to the mobile hotspot service. It is at a body shop about 5 miles away getting repaired after some idiot hit me in a parking lot and did not leave their name. So the Corsair should not be communicating with the internet. Yet I just got two messages on my phone saying my car was going to sleep because of a low battery? How could the message be sent to me???

Hi felix. Your 2020 Corsair is equipped with the vehicle modem and you do not need to be subscribed to the "mobile hotspot service" to use the LincolnWay app features.

As long as your Corsair is parked someplace that receives a cell signal, all the LincolnWay app features will work. So your vehicle and the LincolnWay app can communicate with each other to relay certain systems information such as vehicle location, fuel level, tire pressures, remaining oil life etc. You can also use the LincolnWay app to start your Corsair and lock/unlock the doors from across the globe.

If you wanted to use your vehicle as a hotspot for yourself and others, then you would need to subscribe to the "mobile hotspot service".

Good luck.
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OldBrit

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Hi OldBrit. Yes, ambient temperature is one of the factors taken into consideration when enabling battery saver mode.

A more detailed explanation is also contained in our Lincoln Way apps and Owner Manuals.

It is difficult to determine over the Internet whether your particular vehicle has an issue, but ambient temperatures are a factor in when battery saver mode is enabled.

Le us know how you make out and good luck..
As a follow-up to this thread, if anyone is still interested, I bought a battery tester. My battery in its resting state showed a charge of a tad over 12 volts, and with the engine running, it showed a charge of over 15 volts. My automotive know-how is somewhere around the "layman plus" range, but 15+ volts seems a bit high to me. My understanding is that the charging rate should be about 13.5 to 14.5 volts, and I'm wondering if my alternator is frying the battery, because two days later I went to start my car and it was absolutely dead. I couldn't even unlock the door, so I had to use the emergency key from the key fob (as an aside, have you ever used that key? Geez! It felt flimsy! I was worried that it would break off in the door, to compound my problems). I hooked up my Genius wicked smart charger, which proved to be neither a genius, nor smart, because every darn LED light on it started flashing. So I hauled out my old Motomaster charger from the basement and hooked that up. After a bit of crackling and sparking, probably due to a few years accumulation of dust, it settled down and after a couple of hours I was able to start the car. My dealer couldn't book me in for a few days, but suggested that I use their "Quick Lane" outlet, where an appointment is not necessary, so I drove there the next day, after leaving the charger on all night. I had always thought that the Quick Lane was a drive-through oil-change place, like a Jiffy Lube, but it turned out to be a full-service outlet, with about six bays and a waiting lounge. The only difference from the regular dealership that I could see, apart from not needing an appointment, is that they don't wash your car or provide a loaner or shuttle service. There was no hemming and hawing about my need for a new battery, which suggests to me that they were aware of such problems with the Corsair, not that they would ever admit to that. They even serviced the car, which was handy. I was there for about three hours, which included testing my battery and then letting it sit for an hour for a re-test, which I guess was to see how much charge it lost.

Now for the follow up...

When I approached the car the next morning, the welcoming lights lit up, which indicated that all was well (which it should be, with a brand-new battery and a 250 km (155 mile) drive home). But twenty minutes later when I approached, they didn't light up, and that's something I've noticed a couple of times since. So, does the computer in this car have a "petulant" mode, where it says, in effect, "Hey! I already greeted you once today, and you want me to greet you again? Who are you, some sort of prima donna?" And then, a couple of days later, whilst sitting in the car in a downtown parking lot, a neighbour walked by and I wound down the passenger window to talk to him. Then I hit the "one-touch" window up button, and the window went up, then came back down again. So I hit the button again, and the window went up and then came down again. I know that power windows have an auto-reverse feature in case little Bartholomew sticks his grubby fingers out when the window is coming up, but definitely there was nothing blocking the window. I managed to close the window by raising it a fraction at a time. The strange thing is, exactly the same thing had happened with my 2015 Subaru Legacy. The service manager at that dealership muttered something about "a faulty module" but that's just the new codespeak for when they have no idea what's wrong. When driving home I tried the window again and the one-touch thing didn't work at all - I had to close the window by holding the button up. Okay. I can live with that. But the next day it all worked fine. Go figure.

And then yesterday, all was fine and I drove downtown and parked the car. When I returned after about an hour, this brand-new battery had gone into its "battery saver" mode. Geez! It was -5C (23F). Am I gonna be plagued with this because of the temperature? I live in Canada! We have winter for 5 months or more! I paid big bucks for all these features which won't work for about half the year? My previous car, a 2017 Highlander, had pretty much all these convenience features - welcoming lights, auto start/stop, etc. The only thing it didn't have was the hands-free liftgate. The convenience features worked perfectly fine all winter long, even after sitting for a couple of weeks at -20C (-4F).

I have a feeling that the electrical problems with the Corsair are not due to bad batteries. Even if FoMoCo had had a bad batch delivered when they started building the Corsair, they surely wouldn't still be using them and issuing them as replacements (some folks have even had up to three replacements). I think the fault must lie in the car's electrical system and I have a nagging suspicion that simply replacing the battery has not cured my problems. I'm the sort of guy that easily gets soured on a car and if it gets problematic, and much as I love the Corsair, I'm likely to cut my losses and trade it off.

I apologise for such a long, rambling post. Hey! What else is there to do now?
 

2DS

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Sorry to hear your one of us plagued with the dead battery syndrome. Lincoln should be doing something about this to correct the issue. Not have dealers tell us to buy battery chargers and whatnot. Try for a buyback or something. I agree the corsairs are nice but the issues are seriously dragging it down.
 

OldBrit

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Sorry to hear your one of us plagued with the dead battery syndrome. Lincoln should be doing something about this to correct the issue. Not have dealers tell us to buy battery chargers and whatnot. Try for a buyback or something. I agree the corsairs are nice but the issues are seriously dragging it down.
We don't have any sort of a "lemon law" in Canada, as there is in the USA, and I've never heard of a dealer buying back a car from a dissatisfied customer. And, as far as the dealer is concerned, the problem has been fixed by the installation of a new battery. And maybe it has - it's just me, being a suspicious old coot, that has concerns that there still will be problems looming in the future. My car was built in September 2019 (bought in December 2019), so the battery lasted 18 months. If the new one last 18 months, which takes it to September 2022, the car will still be under warranty. Next time I take it in for service, or maybe sooner, I'll discuss the high alternator charging rate with the service manager.
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Black Label

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We don't have any sort of a "lemon law" in Canada, as there is in the USA, and I've never heard of a dealer buying back a car from a dissatisfied customer. And, as far as the dealer is concerned, the problem has been fixed by the installation of a new battery. And maybe it has - it's just me, being a suspicious old coot, that has concerns that there still will be problems looming in the future. My car was built in September 2019 (bought in December 2019), so the battery lasted 18 months. If the new one last 18 months, which takes it to September 2022, the car will still be under warranty. Next time I take it in for service, or maybe sooner, I'll discuss the high alternator charging rate with the service manager.
Lincoln itself, not a dealer, is offering to buy back my vehicle because of ongoing and unsolved software issues.
 
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G-697776

i went through 3 batteries already with less than 5,000 miles. I see it on here alot must be an issue with corsair's. You shouldnt have to buy a charger on a brand new vehicle. I was told the same thing. Still no solution to the battery drain. Been in the garage 5 times already
My 2020 Lincoln Corsair has the same problem. The lights in the center console do not go out....until the battery saver shuts them off. Thus the drained battery. Tryiny to get deal to fix. Originally told by dealer "If the car starts what is the problem". Not a good thing to hear on a new car.
 
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