Quick question about the engine air bleed screw

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West

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I had to replace the degas bottle on my 2002 Lincoln LS v6. Just installed the new bottle, now I"m going to bleed the system of air. I found the engine air bleed and the heater air bleed.. But I have never done this before. Am I supposed to completely remove these screws? Because the heater air bleed comes all the way out, but the engine air bleed screw seems to just spin in place when I turn it. I wanted to check with you guys as to how the engine air bleed screw is supposed to behave before I really start trying to get that thing out of there. Is it supposed to just unscrew counter clockwise and come all the way out like a regular screw? Or am I missing something

Thank you in advance

-West
 

Town

Senior Member
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Ottawa Ontario Canada
I have not worked on an LS, but the instructions imply a counter clockwise rotation of the engine bleed screw. If it had a reverse thread then that would be mentioned. The instructions say that coolant must come out from the engine bleed which implies the screw is removed. Sounds like the same instructions for the heater bleed except the engine must be idling for several minutes and coolant flowing from the heater bleed, and then close the heater bleed. The fill and bleed procedure for 3.0 liter V6 engines is reproduced below without reference to the V8 and re-numbered accordingly:

On 3.0L engines
1. Open the engine air bleed.

2. Open the heater air bleed.

3. Add coolant to the degas bottle allowing the system to equalize until no more coolant can be added.

4. Close the engine air bleed when coolant begins to escape.

5. Replace the degas bottle cap.

CAUTION: Care must be taken to ensure the accessory drive belt does not become contaminated with engine coolant.

6. Note: The heater air bleed remains open and start the engine and turn the heater to MAX position.

7. Close the heater air bleed when a steady stream of coolant comes from it, during engine idle.

8. Allow the engine to idle for five minutes, add coolant to the degas bottle as needed to maintain the cold fill MAX mark.

9. Reopen the heater air bleed to release any entrapped air and close again.

10. Maintain engine speed of 1,500 rpm for 3-5 minutes or until hot air comes from the heater.

11. Return to idle and verify hot air is still coming from the heater.

12. Set the heater temperature setting to 24ºC (75ºF) and allow the vehicle to idle for two minutes.

13. Shut the engine off and allow to cool.

14. After the engine has cooled, add coolant to the degas bottle to bring the level to the cold fill MAX mark.


Good luck.
 

Town

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Probably the threads are stripped. Sometimes you can put a thin blade under the screw head and apply upward pressure to help what threads are left catch to unthread the screw. If the threads are pulled out it is surprising it has not leaked before. Can you put a locking pliers on the screw head to provide leverage to lift up on the screw while turning counter clockwise.

The use of an extractor may not work because there is no resistance to the screw turning, when being drilled and self tapped by the extractor with a left hand thread.

Good luck.
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Thread starter #5

West

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Naw there is no way.. The screw is positioned in such a way that it is sunken into it's O receiver and there is no way to get underneath it. Though I don't know how the threads could be stripped- this is the first time I have ever touched it. Damn thing is made out of plastic, it probably melted when my car was overheating.

Is there any way to bleed the air out of the system without using this specific screw? I couldn't even afford to replace the degas bottle, and now I'm getting the feeling I'm going to have to replace my entire effing upper radiator hose assembly just to have a structurally integrid cooling system...
 
Thread starter #6

West

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What if I took it to a shop and had them flush my coolant? About 2 months ago I had my coolant flushed at a shop, and they hooked it up to a machine that sucked the old coolant out and pumped the new coolant in a vacuum.. They never touched the bleeds.
 
Thread starter #7

West

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I just noticed there is a hose going right to the engine bleed.. Could I possibly take this hose off and use it as the bleed and reattach after coolant flows? Here is a picture

http://postimg.org/image/jjljurrs1/

and that hose goes here:

http://postimg.org/image/4p8po1dh9/

The one on the left, that connects to the metal tube going into the engine

I think I should be able to, since it comes off of the top of the block and into the radiator hose.. makes sense that when the block is full of coolant it would drain from the top same as the bleed screw would
 

Town

Senior Member
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Ottawa Ontario Canada
What you propose by removing the hose from the plastic bleed fitting sounds reasonable and should work OK to allow air to escape and coolant to fill the engine. Depending on the size of that hose you may be able to get a T fitting with a ball valve (or cap) spliced into the hose. Prestone make such a fitting and there may be other generic ones.

Looks expensive to replace the bleed fitting the way it attaches.

Good luck.
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Thread starter #9

West

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Ok, i'm going to try. I am wondering though, what would be the purpose of the T fitting spliced into the hose? I was going to bleed the air out through that hose until coolant flowed, then re-attach it and continue the bleeding process.
 

Town

Senior Member
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Ottawa Ontario Canada
The T would be a permanent replacement for the broken engine air bleed.

The picture of the air bleed screw appears to show a hollow fitting. You may be able to get a hooked tool in there with the screwdriver to provide upward force to help remove the screw.

Good luck.
 

Bobdog

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Probably the threads are stripped. Sometimes you can put a thin blade under the screw head and apply upward pressure to help what threads are left catch to unthread the screw. If the threads are pulled out it is surprising it has not leaked before. Can you put a locking pliers on the screw head to provide leverage to lift up on the screw while turning counter clockwise.

The use of an extractor may not work because there is no resistance to the screw turning, when being drilled and self tapped by the extractor with a left hand thread.

Good luck.
hi where is the engine air bleed screw i bin at it all morning
 
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