Poor ride quality - how can it be improved?

OmegaLincoln

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Well then, GM must suffer the same affliction, if you look at the Cadillac CT6 that was roughly comparable, if a bit more expensive, you see the same fate. Unimpressive as the Conti’s sales numbers were, the CT6’s were worse. And it is no more, either. I drove both before I bought and there’s no question in my mind which is better but neither American car is in production while the imports thrive. Go figure.

I'd say more like the ATS. But sure, GM made some big moves as well. Big shocker for me was they moved on from the CVT-S. But at the end of the day, they still produce sedans. So does Chevy.

Back to the subject, this continental doesn't drive like the Lincoln sedans of the past. You feel connected to the road. The car is very responsive. Refined if you will. That handling comes with a cost. No set of tires is going to turn this into a crown vic. The new continental doesn't make a very good sale rep car either. Where you would see a lot of the MKS on the road.
 

Corsart

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Well then, GM must suffer the same affliction, if you look at the Cadillac CT6 that was roughly comparable, if a bit more expensive, you see the same fate. Unimpressive as the Conti’s sales numbers were, the CT6’s were worse. And it is no more, either. I drove both before I bought and there’s no question in my mind which is better but neither American car is in production while the imports thrive
 

brucelinc

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I also went from an MKS to a Continental. Not everyone has the same criteria for ride quality but I would say the Conti is an improvement over the MKS. My MKS was a 2010 ecoboost and did not have the adjustable suspension. Later model MKSs did so they might be better. In normal or sport mode, the Conti is somewhat similar to my 2010 MKS in ride. In comfort mode, it is more plush. In terms of sporty handling, the Conti is better regardless of suspension setting. The Conti is a bit quieter than the MKS and the seats are vastly better in my opinion. There were some things about the MKS that I liked better, though.

Cars with sloppy mushy rides are pretty much extinct. I rent a number of different vehicles for business and I haven't found one that rode any more comfortably than the Continental. Mine does have the 19" Michelins and I keep them at around 31-32 PSI. I drove several different Continentals before ordering mine and I did not like the 20" Goodyears nearly as well as the Michelins.
 

Corsart

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I think we'd need to define "Thrive", unless the definition here is "Still in production".

Last year, one in three Mercedes sold worldwide was an SUV, higher in the USA. That they still make cars results more from their exposure to global markets and the need to appeal to vastly different local needs and consumer preferences. Ford and GM, for all their global reach, are still very much American companies with products focused on the USA market. So, when the SUV craze infected the American consumer, they followed the money. I don't agree with the discontinuance of cars, but in context of their local strategy, it makes sense. The Continental... the Cadillac cannot be considered in the same league, it's just another GM product with a stitched dashboard...just wasn't selling in the volume to justify production. It has nothing to do with the actual quality of the car itself...I drove it and found it superb.

With regards to the actual OP, that the dealer found no evidence of malfunction, and the OP confirmed this with another test drive (?), then the claim here is another example of unreasonable expectations or some other set of personal factors or issues that have little to do with the car.. Perhaps s/he could lower the psi 5 lbs or so, there's no harm in that.
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m1nkyb0y

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I've gotten used to the rough ride around town. The highway is where it shines. That's OK with me.
Has anyone had the ACC get you going too fast into a traffic stoppage, I actually took control twice and did minimum distance stops, it was very scary but the car stopped amazingly well. I wonder how the narrower tires would make out in those scenarios.
 

Corsart

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No gain, either. I did that; no significant difference.
I think a lot of it is due to tires generally, with the mpg emphasis, the treads and belts under them are "Harder" to decrease rolling resistance. I know that on other cars I've replaced tires on, they all seem to have harder compound.
 

MarkX

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I think we'd need to define "Thrive", unless the definition here is "Still in production".
During the Conti's years in production, the M-B E-Class generally outsold the Continental 10 to 1 in the US market and of course many more units outside the US. Given the E-Class is inferior to the Conti in most regards and is more expensive, I would stay to my verb "thrive" in a relative sense. The cause of CT6s and Contis going out of production is that they did not sell in sufficient numbers; their sales are not down primarily because Ford and GM stopped production.

Sure, there is a general market drift away from the four-door format to other things like SUVs and pickups but other companies with cars in this segment are hanging in there. There seem to be no signs of the E-Class, as an example, going out of production.
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MarkX

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I think a lot of it is due to tires generally, with the mpg emphasis, the treads and belts under them are "Harder" to decrease rolling resistance. I know that on other cars I've replaced tires on, they all seem to have harder compound.
Any car thats ride quality is dependent on the customer getting tire pressure, brand, and style exactly right is a poorly engineered car in that respect.
 

OmegaLincoln

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I think we'd need to define "Thrive", unless the definition here is "Still in production".

Last year, one in three Mercedes sold worldwide was an SUV, higher in the USA. That they still make cars results more from their exposure to global markets and the need to appeal to vastly different local needs and consumer preferences. Ford and GM, for all their global reach, are still very much American companies with products focused on the USA market. So, when the SUV craze infected the American consumer, they followed the money. I don't agree with the discontinuance of cars, but in context of their local strategy, it makes sense. The Continental... the Cadillac cannot be considered in the same league, it's just another GM product with a stitched dashboard...just wasn't selling in the volume to justify production. It has nothing to do with the actual quality of the car itself...I drove it and found it superb.

With regards to the actual OP, that the dealer found no evidence of malfunction, and the OP confirmed this with another test drive (?), then the claim here is another example of unreasonable expectations or some other set of personal factors or issues that have little to do with the car.. Perhaps s/he could lower the psi 5 lbs or so, there's no harm in that.
I was told the backseat package was in response to the Chinese markets where young tech people prefer to be chauffeured. But then they advertised the vehicle in the US market with the same features where you're most likely to have a teenager/ empty backseat.

The only trend I've noticed in the last decade is a move towards more horsepower. Doesn't matter what segment really. That's why it was huge swing and a miss not to give the Nautilus an engine update to 400hp in 2021. It would solidly competed with the Porsche badge at that point. But it's also probably the reason why they didn't give the Nautilus an engine upgrade.

I did forget to mention that I do have 20s on my Continental so my opinion of comfort ride my be skewed.
 

Corsart

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During the Conti's years in production, the M-B E-Class generally outsold the Continental 10 to 1 in the US market and of course many more units outside the US. Given the E-Class is inferior to the Conti in most regards and is more expensive, I would stay to my verb "thrive" in a relative sense. The cause of CT6s and Contis going out of production is that they did not sell in sufficient numbers; their sales are not down primarily because Ford and GM stopped production.

Sure, there is a general market drift away from the four-door format to other things like SUVs and pickups but other companies with cars in this segment are hanging in there. There seem to be no signs of the E-Class, as an example, going out of production.
Generally, there's often little correlation between popularity and superiority. You now bring up the excellent point of marketing and image. Most buy an MB or BMW in spite of the fact that it's a reasonably good car. I grew up on steady diet of MB products, starting with our 6.3, and let me tell you, today's Benz is not your father's Benz. Every time I need a new car, I nostalgically return to the MB dealer, only to be disappointed. Lately horrified: Fake exhaust tips? Manufactured engine sounds? iPhone dash boards? The kids might love this shit, but for those of us out of puberty and with an appreciation for good cars and fine engineering, the only excuse to buy one is simply bc you want one. And the marketing dept. makes sure of that, their message is finely honed and utterly consistent. That's where Lincoln (and Cadillac, what's left of it) utterly fail. Lincoln has great product, but sloppy, unfocused marketing, and Ford generally has an impatient approach at brand development and the stuff that needs to be carefully integrated into that to make it successful. If not immediately then in 5 years.
 

OmegaLincoln

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Generally, there's often little correlation between popularity and superiority. You now bring up the excellent point of marketing and image. Most buy an MB or BMW in spite of the fact that it's a reasonably good car. I grew up on steady diet of MB products, starting with our 6.3, and let me tell you, today's Benz is not your father's Benz. Every time I need a new car, I nostalgically return to the MB dealer, only to be disappointed. Lately horrified: Fake exhaust tips? Manufactured engine sounds? iPhone dash boards? The kids might love this shit, but for those of us out of puberty and with an appreciation for good cars and fine engineering, the only excuse to buy one is simply bc you want one. And the marketing dept. makes sure of that, their message is finely honed and utterly consistent. That's where Lincoln (and Cadillac, what's left of it) utterly fail. Lincoln has great product, but sloppy, unfocused marketing, and Ford generally has an impatient approach at brand development and the stuff that needs to be carefully integrated into that to make it successful. If not immediately then in 5 years.

The cost of marketing is rolled in to the cost of the vehicle. You want it more because they market it more. So therefore it cost more.
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Corsart

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The cost of marketing is rolled in to the cost of the vehicle. You want it more because they market it more. So therefore it cost more.
It's not the cost of the marketing, its the quality of it, its effectiveness. BMW doesn't have to spend as much bc they're basically reinforcing a pre existing and very effective slogan, the "Ultimate driving machine" nonsense, and MB "Like no other car in the world" bullshit. It takes less to reinforce a message than to create and maintain one. Lincoln right now is looking to cut costs while simultaneously trying to make their brand and their image more appealing. So, BMW can get away with deleting the spare tire while Lincoln simply cannot.
 

MarkX

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I grew up on steady diet of MB products
Me, too. The first one I drove was my uncle's 300, now known as "the Adenauer." But the first Continental (with the suicide doors) I drove was his, too. I still have a W124 500E that I bought nearly thirty years ago. But the silver star is not tattooed on my chest and I try to stay objective about these things. Hence, my current primary car is not an MB, but something better.
 

Corsart

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Me, too. The first one I drove was my uncle's 300, now known as "the Adenauer." But the first Continental (with the suicide doors) I drove was his, too. I still have a W124 500E that I bought nearly thirty years ago. But the silver star is not tattooed on my chest and I try to stay objective about these things. Hence, my current primary car is not an MB, but something better.
It's ironic, but as a kid I recall how the MB doors thunked shut, how firm all the controls felt..none present in their current products. And when I drove the Corsair I ultimately bought, all that was there, its funny how evolution works: Those who want, do. And those who did, often get lazy. If Lincoln can shut the bean counters up and let the designers do their thing, they might actually make a name in this overcrowded segment. The car is not "German", its not Asian, it's uniquely American.
 

jhartz

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Took the 2020 for a weekend trip to Charlotte. Rides ok, but between 50 and 65 the 20" Goodyears seem out of balance -- I will let the dealer try to rebalance. But the 19 Michelins on the 17 rode much smoother. At 85, the Goodyears smoothed out (or maybe the NC roads are smoother than VA's). Handling is better (much better) in the 2020 with the 3.0L mill.

Shop still unable to finish repairing Bambi Killer: some issue with the alternator -- although I think they have probably buggered a connector on reassembling the front and right side. Lease is up in April and I have no place to park it due to condo rules, so I'll let them play with it a bit longer.
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OmegaLincoln

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It's not the cost of the marketing, its the quality of it, its effectiveness. BMW doesn't have to spend as much bc they're basically reinforcing a pre existing and very effective slogan, the "Ultimate driving machine" nonsense, and MB "Like no other car in the world" bullshit. It takes less to reinforce a message than to create and maintain one. Lincoln right now is looking to cut costs while simultaneously trying to make their brand and their image more appealing. So, BMW can get away with deleting the spare tire while Lincoln simply cannot.

I'd argue cost equals quality when it comes to marketing. But I get what you're saying.

Prior to this recent trend of A4 and 3 Series everywhere like mosquitos, it was all Accords and Camrys. Spotting a Nissan Maxima in the wild is rare these days. People have left the MPG cars for performance. And people will always prefer performance over mpg if having the option. What made Lincoln great was they already had plush down. So when Ford gave them twin-turbo performance engines... they became immediate contenders IMO. Mistake on their part not to brand the twin-turbos on the car in some fashion. Like Nautilus T or something. It would let people know what's under the hood.
 

OmegaLincoln

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Took the 2020 for a weekend trip to Charlotte. Rides ok, but between 50 and 65 the 20" Goodyears seem out of balance -- I will let the dealer try to rebalance. But the 19 Michelins on the 17 rode much smoother. At 85, the Goodyears smoothed out (or maybe the NC roads are smoother than VA's). Handling is better (much better) in the 2020 with the 3.0L mill.

Shop still unable to finish repairing Bambi Killer: some issue with the alternator -- although I think they have probably buggered a connector on reassembling the front and right side. Lease is up in April and I have no place to park it due to condo rules, so I'll let them play with it a bit longer.
I'm experiencing the same with my Eagles. I'm going to have mine checked as well.
 

Corsart

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I'd argue cost equals quality when it comes to marketing. But I get what you're saying.

Prior to this recent trend of A4 and 3 Series everywhere like mosquitos, it was all Accords and Camrys. Spotting a Nissan Maxima in the wild is rare these days. People have left the MPG cars for performance. And people will always prefer performance over mpg if having the option. What made Lincoln great was they already had plush down. So when Ford gave them twin-turbo performance engines... they became immediate contenders IMO. Mistake on their part not to brand the twin-turbos on the car in some fashion. Like Nautilus T or something. It would let people know what's under the hood.
Sadly, cost doesn't result in quality as we agree with current MB products! I'd also agree about A4 and 3, although the same can be said for the entire line up..they are ubiquit bc of image. Performance? I don't think so, it's hard finding a BMW with a proper 3 pedal set up outside of the M series. But I define performance differently, and surely more than straight line acceleration. What makes Lincoln different currently is the twin turbo (+1 for special identification, too) but also, that it melds good performance with actual comfort. Even my 2.0 Corsair performs more than adequately, but not at the cost of ride and quiet. That's Lincoln's secret sauce: Good performance and good comfort. Along with really nice, elegant style. Why those things became inverse to each other is beyond me.
 

OmegaLincoln

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Sadly, cost doesn't result in quality as we agree with current MB products! I'd also agree about A4 and 3, although the same can be said for the entire line up..they are ubiquit bc of image. Performance? I don't think so, it's hard finding a BMW with a proper 3 pedal set up outside of the M series. But I define performance differently, and surely more than straight line acceleration. What makes Lincoln different currently is the twin turbo (+1 for special identification, too) but also, that it melds good performance with actual comfort. Even my 2.0 Corsair performs more than adequately, but not at the cost of ride and quiet. That's Lincoln's secret sauce: Good performance and good comfort. Along with really nice, elegant style. Why those things became inverse to each other is beyond me.

That's the thing. Ford/Lincoln never really pushed the performance of their engines in the marketing campaigns. I know I surprised more than a few with the raw power of my MKS back in the day. People had no clue it was a dressed up SHO with twin-turbos under the hood. Add the Lincoln interior and forget about it. You had to spend double to get that kind of quality out of a Euro.

I just don't buy the consumer doesn't want a sedan these days. I'd say just the opposite.
 
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