Oil change Intervals

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zebra03

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No need to start an argument , I'm just curious . What does everybody use and at what intervals ?

Conventional oil and 3,000 miles . Yes old school
 

jkeaton

Well-known member
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Winston Salem, NC
Motorcraft synthetic blend and motorcraft filter, 5000 miles/6 months, whichever happens first (per the manual).
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Corsart

Well-known member
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I typically halve the manufacturers recommendation, so 5000 miles or so, synthetic, MC filter.

You can change it at any point up to or prior to the recommendation, but it isn't necessary. It is more important to make sure you use an oil that meets or exceeds the Ford's specifications as outlined in your owner's manual, and use a quality oil filter.
 

bbf2530

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No need to start an argument , I'm just curious . What does everybody use and at what intervals ?

Conventional oil and 3,000 miles . Yes old school

Hi zebra. I follow the Lincoln/Ford recommended oil change intervals for each of my cars. And I have my oil changes performed at my local Lincoln or Ford Dealers, using the available coupons for "The Works" Package. $39.95 for a Motorcraft Synthetic Blend oil change, tire rotation, check and top off of all fluids and multi-point inspection.

For my older MKZ the recommended OCI is 1 year/7,500 miles (whichever comes first). For my newer MKZ, it is 1 year/10,000 miles (whichever comes first).

However, since we only put perhaps 5,000 miles per year on each car (even pre-pandemic), we essentially wind up changing at 1 year OCI's with perhaps ~5,000 miles on each car.

Good luck everyone.
 

zebra03

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I just remembered , I have Lincoln taking care of my oil changes because they are free . What oil will I get from the dealership ? Full synthetic or syn blend?
 

bbf2530

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Can you elaborate a little more concerning turbos and full synthetic's ?

Hi zebra. Nowadays, it is not necessary or required to use a full synthetic with a turbocharged engine. As others have mentioned previously, all that is necessary is to use an oil that "meets and/or exceeds" the specific Lincoln/Ford specification which is listed in the Owners Manual for your particular vehicle. You can find that specification in the "Maintenance and Specifications" section of your Owners Manual.

In the old days, using a full synthetic would be wise. However, oil technology has progressed far, and today's' synthetic blends more than do the job for anything other than cars being raced on the track.

That being said, if anyone feels more comfortable using a full synthetic that "meets and/or exceeds" the Lincoln/Ford specification (stating so on the bottle), they should certainly do so.

Good luck.
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bbf2530

Junior Member
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I just remembered , I have Lincoln taking care of my oil changes because they are free . What oil will I get from the dealership ? Full synthetic or syn blend?

Hi zebra. Our posts crossed in the mail...lol

Your complementary oil changes will be performed with Motorcraft Synthetic Blend oil.

You can request full synthetic. Unless your Dealer is very accommodating, there will be an upcharge.

Good luck.
 
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Corsart

Well-known member
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I just remembered , I have Lincoln taking care of my oil changes because they are free . What oil will I get from the dealership ? Full synthetic or syn blend?
Your dealer will use the MC syn blend (a fine brew) that is just fine for your application.

There's some confusion about what actually constitutes "Synthetic" oil. Many believe it is made from a recipe of unrelated components added together to create "oil". That is not entirely accurate. "Synthetic" oils are actually dino oil, with their molecules rearranged. The more rearrangement, the higher the "Synthetic" component. For classification purposes, an oil cannot be considered a "Synthetic" unless it exceeds..I recall, no google reference...11%. So, the difference between a "semi syn" and a "full" syn can be a few percentage points. Taken with the wear additives, the difference to your engine is truly negligible. The most important thing is to make sure the oil you chose meets or exceeds Ford's requirements based on the specs. I'd doubt dino/conventional oil meets that standard for a turbo engine.

 

bbf2530

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Hi again zebra. Oh, now that you mention the Lincoln complementary oil changes, a not important but somewhat funny story: The oil changes on my 2018 MKZ wound up being complementary for 5 years. One oil change was from Lincoln as standard with the vehicle purchase, and 3 more full service (The Works Package) changes were negotiated into the contract when we purchased the car (mostly by my small, pretty but very scary Italian wife:ROFLMAO:).
Then...1 more was added by the Service Manager as a courtesy after my second oil change was performed. This occurred due to them losing/temporarily misplacing my car in their service lot, in between the service bay and wash/prep/detail building. Since I did not complain, rage or cause a scene for the extraordinarily long time it took for an oil change and tire rotation, the Service Manager added another "The Works Package" to my account. Just goes to show how not being whiny and needlessly opinionated can get us further in life.
EDIT- With my very limited mileage (the 2018 is now 3+ years old with only 12,000 miles), that gives me 5 years of oil changes.

I use the available $39.95 "The Works Package" coupons for our older MKZ.

Good luck again!
 

zebra03

New member
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Hi again zebra. Oh, now that you mention the Lincoln complementary oil changes, a not important but somewhat funny story: The oil changes on my 2018 MKZ wound up being complementary for 5 years. One oil change was from Lincoln as standard with the vehicle purchase, and 3 more full service (The Works Package) changes were negotiated into the contract when we purchased the car (mostly by my small, pretty but very scary Italian wife:ROFLMAO:).
Then...1 more was added by the Service Manager as a courtesy after my second oil change was performed. This occurred due to them losing/temporarily misplacing my car in their service lot, in between the service bay and wash/prep/detail building. Since I did not complain, rage or cause a scene for the extraordinarily long time it took for an oil change and tire rotation, the Service Manager added another "The Works Package" to my account. Just goes to show how not being whiny and needlessly opinionated can get us further in life.
EDIT- With my very limited mileage (the 2018 is now 3+ years old with only 12,000 miles), that gives me 5 years of oil changes.

I use the available $39.95 "The Works Package" coupons for our older MKZ.

Good luck again!
Lincoln has been good to me as well . After a deer hit me in March , the garage that was doing the work could not get me a bumper . I contacted Lincoln concierge and calmly told them my problem. I asked if they could find me a bumper. LC tried hard but had no more luck than my garage. For my troubles , they added some oil changes to my car's account as well . Very nice.

The bumper finally showed up and all is well.
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RedGeminiPA

Active member
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Altoona, PA
Can you elaborate a little more concerning turbos and full synthetic's ?
I won't get into an argument over this. When you're dealing with a very high heat environment, with turbos spinning up to 200,000 RPMS at temps that are much higher than non-turbo engines, you need an oil that has high thermal resistance and lubricity. You will NOT find that in any conventional oils. The basic properties of a turbo remain the same now as they did 20+ years ago. If you're not using an oil with high thermal breakdown resistance, it will sludge, starve the turbo(s), and lead to problems. With turbos becoming mainstream, and most people don't know proper care for them (NEVER shut them off after hard driving until it's idled for about a minute), it's leading to engine problems in modern cars that could be avoided.

I just replaced the turbo in my 2005 Volvo S80 2.5T project car because the previous owner used junk oil in it, and didn't do short change intervals to compensate for it. If that was an issue at 144k miles on a low pressure turbo engine in the Volvo, the same practice would be catastrophic if applied to the 3.5L twin turbo in the MKT. I believe junk (non-synthetic) oils used previously in my '14 MKT were partly (maybe wholly) to blame for timing chain clatter that started at just over 80k miles. The clatter went away after a new timing chain and tensioners were installed as part of the water pump replacement at 130k miles. I've been running Pennzoil Platinum full synthetic in it since the first oil change I did on it.


 

bbf2530

Junior Member
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I won't get into an argument over this. When you're dealing with a very high heat environment, with turbos spinning up to 200,000 RPMS at temps that are much higher than non-turbo engines, you need an oil that has high thermal resistance and lubricity. You will NOT find that in any conventional oils. The basic properties of a turbo remain the same now as they did 20+ years ago. If you're not using an oil with high thermal breakdown resistance, it will sludge, starve the turbo(s), and lead to problems. With turbos becoming mainstream, and most people don't know proper care for them (NEVER shut them off after hard driving until it's idled for about a minute), it's leading to engine problems in modern cars that could be avoided.

I just replaced the turbo in my 2005 Volvo S80 2.5T project car because the previous owner used junk oil in it, and didn't do short change intervals to compensate for it. If that was an issue at 144k miles on a low pressure turbo engine in the Volvo, the same practice would be catastrophic if applied to the 3.5L twin turbo in the MKT. I believe junk (non-synthetic) oils used previously in my '14 MKT were partly (maybe wholly) to blame for timing chain clatter that started at just over 80k miles. The clatter went away after a new timing chain and tensioners were installed as part of the water pump replacement at 130k miles. I've been running Pennzoil Platinum full synthetic in it since the first oil change I did on it.



Hi RG. Just to be on the safe side, I wanted to state that I was not arguing, and 100% agree with you that "conventional" oil should not be used in our turbocahrged vehicles (or nearly any newer vehicle, even naturally aspirated). I was simply stating that a "full synthetic" oil is not required by Lincoln/Ford.

To clarify a bit more: Each of us needs to use an oil that meets and/or exceeds the SAE specification listed in their particular Owners Manual. And as far as I know, most "conventional oils" no longer meet those SAE specifications.
However, the Motorcraft Synthetic Blend (which is the factory fill) and other synthetic blend oils that meet the Lincoln/Ford SAE specification also provide fine engine protection.

The problem more often occurs when a vehicle owner is not aware that there are specific SAE oil requirements, never looks in their Owners Manual, simply pours in an oil that is the same viscosity as what the oil cap states (or does not double check what oil the local quick change is pouring in), and thinks they did a good job because they "changed the oil".

Those who drive their cars harder or want the added piece of mind of a full synthetic should certainly use a full synthetic. But for many/most owners, the correct synthetic blend also meets and/or exceeds the Lincoln/Ford SAE requirements, so we can use it and also sleep well at night.

So I guess the short story is I agree with essentially everything you said, but was simply stating that a full synthetic oil is not "required" by Lincoln/Ford.

Good luck. :)
 

LinkedMe

New member
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1
3
No need to start an argument , I'm just curious . What does everybody use and at what intervals ?

Conventional oil and 3,000 miles . Yes old school
Mine is done at the dealer using Motorcraft synthetic blend, always with a new filter too. I go in when the computer is 20% to 15% or less, unless I have a long trip planned which may accelerate getting a change, ie I was at 35% but had a 3,500+ mile trip planned (2016 2.7 EcoBoost MKX).
 
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