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TimCooper

New member
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I found this forum yesterday and enjoying the current contributions. I currently own a 2020 Corsair 2.3l reserve with all the bells. While I have had a few issues with the current ride (panel alignment, a few rattles and bad battery issues ) over the past couple of years, I enjoy the quality of ride it provides. When I bought the Corsair, I was wanting to order the hybrid model but was delayed as we all know. Just before Christmas 2021 I ordered a 2022 Corsair Grand touring and wondering if any other Canadians are in the same process of ordering and could share there experiences. I realize it’s way to early to think my order will be in production any time soon( I expect a May or June delivery ). My dealer hasn’t contacted me it’s any updates as it’s only been a few weeks.
I look forward to your response
 

syl

Active member
191
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43
Question: if you're happy with the current vehicle, why switch?

I suppose that one of the issues comes down to will you get the value, as a fellow Canadian driver, of the hybrid electric model? I know that in my own case (I live near Montreal), for how I normally drive (no daily commute; some short local drives, but the bulk of my mileage in non-pandemic times is from infrequent longer drives that would be well out of the range of all-electric vehicles, let alone the electric-only range of a hybrid), there really wouldn't be any benefit. Add to that the percentage of winter driving that we do (that further limits electric range), and I think it's something that should be carefully considered.

I love my 2020 Corsair. Assuming no disasters occur to it between now and then, I fully expect to not start seriously considering the next car before 2035, at which point I likely won't have a choice but to buy an all-electric vehicle (unless I don't buy new), but by then who knows what the technology will offer in terms or range and re-usability of the batteries, and so on.
 

TimCooper

New member
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4
3
Question: if you're happy with the current vehicle, why switch?

I suppose that one of the issues comes down to will you get the value, as a fellow Canadian driver, of the hybrid electric model? I know that in my own case (I live near Montreal), for how I normally drive (no daily commute; some short local drives, but the bulk of my mileage in non-pandemic times is from infrequent longer drives that would be well out of the range of all-electric vehicles, let alone the electric-only range of a hybrid), there really wouldn't be any benefit. Add to that the percentage of winter driving that we do (that further limits electric range), and I think it's something that should be carefully considered.

I love my 2020 Corsair. Assuming no disasters occur to it between now and then, I fully expect to not start seriously considering the next car before 2035, at which point I likely won't have a choice but to buy an all-electric vehicle (unless I don't buy new), but by then who knows what the technology will offer in terms or range and re-usability of the batteries, and so on.
Thank you for the response! As a retired individual in Manitoba, what else to I have to think about. For the last twenty years or so I have traded up every two years. I find that it might cost me about $10k each time I do trade up preserving the value each time. My wife and I have driven hybrids in the past a Toyota Prius V and mkZ for myself. We are down to one vehicle now and I like the idea of preserving the environment by consuming less carbon based fuels.
I am hoping to hear from others on the ordering process got the grand touring in Canada. I can’t be the only one that is ordering one.
 

syl

Active member
191
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Sorry I can't help with your actual question. I grew up in Winnipeg (still have family and friends there and in Southern Manitoba), so I know what you're facing with winter. Though if you were pleased with previous hybrids, I can only imagine that you would be also with the Corsair GT.

I've never owned a hybrid (I've had rentals) but have come to understand that when the engine runs in one, the fuel consumption is more or less similar to a (well maintained, modern) non-hybrid. The gain, of course is in its ability to drive as an electric vehicle at times, but if *most* of the time you're driving with the engine (as I expect would be my own case), is there enough gain to warrant the premium? It looks from your photo that you park in an indoor garage, so I'm sure that would help greatly to not have to start with the engine on every time you go to use it in the winter.

The Corsair Standard, with 2.0 litre engine is by far the most fuel efficient car I've owned (despite being the largest car I've owned). Hrmmm... my 1978 Honda Civic might have been better, actually, but I doubt it would have been by very much, and it certainly wouldn't meet the clean emissions standards that the Corsair meets.
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heywardjr

SUPPORTING MEMBER
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88
18
I have had a 2016 Ford Fusion Titanium Hybrid since 2016 and have totally enjoyed the gas savings. Understand as you drive a hybrid, you relearn the proper way to drive a hybrid. First, the engine and the motor work hand in hand so that as you drive and let off the gas pedal the electric motor kicks in for miles until you go up hill or deeply accelerate. For example, I go from my house to the drug store which is 5.5 miles away round trip. 70% of that is on battery. Often times when I stop the car will advise I got 55 miles per gallon mileage. Sometimes it's less sometimes more. I averaged over time 44 MPG. Highway driving at higher speeds tends to drop you mileage a little.

I love having a hybrid because when you brake properly, that generates a lot of energy that recharges the battery. Going down hill really charges the battery. The car turns off when idling and as soon as you touch the pedal, that engine is started. There is no starter but it uses a generator to start the engine so you never here that standard engine starting noise. It's seamless and quiet when it switches between electric and gas. You do learn to coast to stop so that you can capture a lot of that energy. I'm sure people behind a hybrid don't understand why we drive that way but that is what you do when you have one of these.

I love hybrid and for now that is all I would buy until the battery issues with EV are improved and there is a more robust charging system on the highways.
 

Voidoid

Member
56
40
18
I found this forum yesterday and enjoying the current contributions. I currently own a 2020 Corsair 2.3l reserve with all the bells. While I have had a few issues with the current ride (panel alignment, a few rattles and bad battery issues ) over the past couple of years, I enjoy the quality of ride it provides. When I bought the Corsair, I was wanting to order the hybrid model but was delayed as we all know. Just before Christmas 2021 I ordered a 2022 Corsair Grand touring and wondering if any other Canadians are in the same process of ordering and could share there experiences. I realize it’s way to early to think my order will be in production any time soon( I expect a May or June delivery ). My dealer hasn’t contacted me it’s any updates as it’s only been a few weeks.
I look forward to your response
Hi Tim - not a Canadian, but I am also waiting for a 2022 Corsair GT ordered on 10/9. Lincoln emailed order confirmation later that day. It took 8 weeks until 12/8 to receive the VIN and estimated build week of 1/31. Just yesterday Lincoln emailed to say the build week is pushed until 2/7.

So in my case it will (hopefully!) be 18 weeks from order date to production week, followed by what I assume will be three or so weeks for delivery in New England. I believe a few other people here have had a slightly faster timeline. I am not sure if Canada has a different ordering system / priority or how that all works.

In any event, that's the timeline I am seeing on my order. Hopefully yours is faster!
 

heywardjr

SUPPORTING MEMBER
96
88
18
I believe it all depends on your dealer and how big they are in Ford's business model. My dealer happen to already have some Corsair GT's on order for the lot and they said most likely Lincoln would convert/divert one of those orders for me. That's why I got an email a few weeks ago that said the factory changed my build date from 2/28 to 1/3. They ended up making the car on Friday 1/7 and today (1/10) they programmed the chips in the car. I also saw the trucking company website where they are awaiting my car for transport. The dealer had my priority code as 10 but said the factory sometimes will change that to a lower number for their own purposes.
 

RedHoncho

SUPPORTING MEMBER
305
190
43
Marysville, Ohio
Sorry I can't help with your actual question. I grew up in Winnipeg (still have family and friends there and in Southern Manitoba), so I know what you're facing with winter. Though if you were pleased with previous hybrids, I can only imagine that you would be also with the Corsair GT.

I've never owned a hybrid (I've had rentals) but have come to understand that when the engine runs in one, the fuel consumption is more or less similar to a (well maintained, modern) non-hybrid. The gain, of course is in its ability to drive as an electric vehicle at times, but if *most* of the time you're driving with the engine (as I expect would be my own case), is there enough gain to warrant the premium? It looks from your photo that you park in an indoor garage, so I'm sure that would help greatly to not have to start with the engine on every time you go to use it in the winter.

The Corsair Standard, with 2.0 litre engine is by far the most fuel efficient car I've owned (despite being the largest car I've owned). Hrmmm... my 1978 Honda Civic might have been better, actually, but I doubt it would have been by very much, and it certainly wouldn't meet the clean emissions standards that the Corsair meets.
I'm not from Canada but I do currently own a 2021 Corsair GT. I primarily use mine to drive around our small city. I enjoy the all EV drive and the savings in gas costs. You do need to drive your vehicle where the ICE will take over in order a few times per week to maintain the charge on the 12V battery. Otherwise, you will get the "Vehicle is in deep sleep mode to preserve battery" message on the Lincoln Way app.

I recently took a 1600 mile round trip and experimented with the various drive modes. I was surprised to find the Preserve EV setting resulted in much poorer gas mileage of around 25 MPG (US). Running in Normal mode, the vehicle will act as a traditional hybrid once the high voltage battery has been exhausted. I averaged 35 MPG for the round trip using cruise control but driving above the posted speed limits. The vehicle is rated at 33 MPG in the US.
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TimCooper

New member
5
4
3
Thank you all once again for your contributions. The dealer I ordered my 2022 GT from is a multi city Ford/Lincoln dealership so one can assume they may have a bit of experience with the ordering process. At the time of ordering I was told that my order was moved to the “front of the line” but I assumed it was just a salesman feel good comment. I was also guaranteed that I would be notified of any progress change in the order but once again not holding my breath. As I stated in my intro post I’m in no hurry to receive the vehicle til the spring as I detest driving in the winter salt and grit. I’m just curious if there are others in the same position.
I am definitely looking forward to driving the Grand Touring with all the features I ordered. I only ordered two of the optional packages. I don’t tow and felt the 360 plus option was something I would not use. That being said my 2020 Reserve came with the lane keeping and adaptive cruise. I am not a fan of the lane keeping option as I always felt there was a bit of resistance in the steering. At the cost to include that option I felt it easy to eliminate
 

PaddyH01

Member
68
58
18
Illinois
Sorry I can't help with your actual question. I grew up in Winnipeg (still have family and friends there and in Southern Manitoba), so I know what you're facing with winter. Though if you were pleased with previous hybrids, I can only imagine that you would be also with the Corsair GT.

I've never owned a hybrid (I've had rentals) but have come to understand that when the engine runs in one, the fuel consumption is more or less similar to a (well maintained, modern) non-hybrid. The gain, of course is in its ability to drive as an electric vehicle at times, but if *most* of the time you're driving with the engine (as I expect would be my own case), is there enough gain to warrant the premium? It looks from your photo that you park in an indoor garage, so I'm sure that would help greatly to not have to start with the engine on every time you go to use it in the winter.

The Corsair Standard, with 2.0 litre engine is by far the most fuel efficient car I've owned (despite being the largest car I've owned). Hrmmm... my 1978 Honda Civic might have been better, actually, but I doubt it would have been by very much, and it certainly wouldn't meet the clean emissions standards that the Corsair meets.
You might find this chart interesting: Corsair Reserve vs Corsair Grand Touring PHEV over 5 years
 

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