Motor dropped when lifted without any warning

OdinsValkyrie

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Yesterday my 2002 towncar was lifted to replace the rims. Somehow a radiator hose was torn free, the engine dropped 6 inches and damage was done to the intake manifold. Shop says they didn't do anything wrong. Just my bad luck. There were absolutely no warning signs prior to being lifted. No noise, no vibration, nothing. How is this possible?
 

bbf2530

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Yesterday my 2002 towncar was lifted to replace the rims. Somehow a radiator hose was torn free, the engine dropped 6 inches and damage was done to the intake manifold. Shop says they didn't do anything wrong. Just my bad luck. There were absolutely no warning signs prior to being lifted. No noise, no vibration, nothing. How is this possible?
Hi Odins. Broken motor mounts. Broken/extremely rusted frame sections? Any semi-competent shop should be able to tell you exactly what let go. It is not good luck when something does not break while your car is raised, and it is not simply "bad luck" if something breaks. Something broke. Or much less likely, since raising a car off the ground is not rocket science, they broke something.

It is more likely something broke. But that still is not "bad luck". "Bad luck" is being in the wrong place at the wrong time and being hit by a meteorite. Having an engine drop out of it's mount and frame means something was rusted, weak etc and broke. What was their explanation as to what broke and let go? Did they show you what had happened while it was still up on the lift so you were able to see what broke/let go? They should do that if they did not already.

They are probably not responsible, but should still show/tell you what broke and let go.

Let us know how you make out and good luck.
 
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Houston
I agree six inches seems like a lot! I think there is only about 2 inches between the oil pan and crossmember. I don't see how it could drop more than that.

Please take some pictures and share.

You may have been very lucky the failure happened on a lift and not while you were driving.
 

jkeaton

Active member
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Winston Salem, NC
It's physically impossible for the engine to drop 6". How was the intake damaged if the engine "dropped"? Seems like damage would be done to the oil pan, bell housing, etc. Stuff UNDER the engine. Not on top of the engine. You need to supply some pictures.
______________________________
 

Brian J. Patterson

Active member
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Northern Illinois
Yesterday my 2002 towncar was lifted to replace the rims. Somehow a radiator hose was torn free...
Hello, all.

I've been trying to figure out any way this could have happened since OdinsValkyrie first posted. The only thing I can think of is that the shop replacing the rims used the bottom of the engine as a jacking point.

This would have ripped the motor mounts out of the aluminum engine block and driven the engine violently into the underside of the hood, tearing loose the cooling hose and shattering the plastic intake manifold in the process.

When they brought the car "out of the air," I'm guessing they also released the jack instantly rather than slowly. This would have driven the now mountless engine hard into the top of the front crossmember, crushing the oil pan and bottom of the aluminum engine block to the level of the crankshaft.

In any case, the engine is now scrap. The transmission wasn't helped by all of this "moving about," and is also likely scrap. If the hood was dented by the engine (and how could it not have been?), it's also going to need work, or it may also be scrap. Whether repaired or replaced, the hood will now need to be painted to match the rest of the car.

In short, your Town Car is totaled. You have at least $12,000 worth of repairs if done by repair shops, and a "unicorn-rare" like-new low mileage Town Car would retail for just under $7000. Yours, nice as it was before the "tire shop" happened would likely have wholesaled "pre-tire-shop" for around $2K at best, and would likely have retailed for around $4500 at best.

Please post the news and pictures you get from the "different shop." I'm sure everyone following this thread is interested in seeing what actually happened to the car.

My personal advice, for what it's worth, is to lawyer up and sue. I suspect that this shop will not only try to weasel out on paying for totaling your car, but they will still want to be paid for the now useless to you rims they destroyed your car to install. A competent lawyer in consumer law in your state will help you recover your damages. And you probably won't want those rims on a different car, since they will always remind you of the people who destroyed your last car.

Or, if you have full coverage insurance including comprehensive coverage, you might have to make a claim against that if you aren't able to recover damages from the "tire shop." While this probably shouldn't be your first course of action, it will still be less painful than eating the entire cost of the car yourself.

Good Luck. Sadly, you'll need a lot of it.
 
Hello, all.

I've been trying to figure out any way this could have happened since OdinsValkyrie first posted. The only thing I can think of is that the shop replacing the rims used the bottom of the engine as a jacking point.

This would have ripped the motor mounts out of the aluminum engine block and driven the engine violently into the underside of the hood, tearing loose the cooling hose and shattering the plastic intake manifold in the process.

When they brought the car "out of the air," I'm guessing they also released the jack instantly rather than slowly. This would have driven the now mountless engine hard into the top of the front crossmember, crushing the oil pan and bottom of the aluminum engine block to the level of the crankshaft.

In any case, the engine is now scrap. The transmission wasn't helped by all of this "moving about," and is also likely scrap. If the hood was dented by the engine (and how could it not have been?), it's also going to need work, or it may also be scrap. Whether repaired or replaced, the hood will now need to be painted to match the rest of the car.

In short, your Town Car is totaled. You have at least $12,000 worth of repairs if done by repair shops, and a "unicorn-rare" like-new low mileage Town Car would retail for just under $7000. Yours, nice as it was before the "tire shop" happened would likely have wholesaled "pre-tire-shop" for around $2K at best, and would likely have retailed for around $4500 at best.

Please post the news and pictures you get from the "different shop." I'm sure everyone following this thread is interested in seeing what actually happened to the car.

My personal advice, for what it's worth, is to lawyer up and sue. I suspect that this shop will not only try to weasel out on paying for totaling your car, but they will still want to be paid for the now useless to you rims they destroyed your car to install. A competent lawyer in consumer law in your state will help you recover your damages. And you probably won't want those rims on a different car, since they will always remind you of the people who destroyed your last car.

Or, if you have full coverage insurance including comprehensive coverage, you might have to make a claim against that if you aren't able to recover damages from the "tire shop." While this probably shouldn't be your first course of action, it will still be less painful than eating the entire cost of the car yourself.

Good Luck. Sadly, you'll need a lot of it.
Brian well done. You should think of a new career! Scenario Writer for CSI! Excelent Thesis!https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scenario
 

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