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Looking to buy an LS! Help identify this sound.

kevinfish

New member
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Hi everyone. I'm new here. I just found an 2000 LS8 with 178k miles on it and I'm thinking about going and buying it. The gal who has it says she overheated it a while back (and hired a mechanic to fix the problem) but then it started missing (where she was advised it might be the coil packs, which are still unfixed I'm believing) but then it started making this noise. I'm wondering if it's something like the cam chain tensioner or is it something requiring a major tear down (e.g. piston slap).

Lincoln LS - Google Drive
 

bbf2530

Junior Member
597
151
43
Hi everyone. I'm new here. I just found an 2000 LS8 with 178k miles on it and I'm thinking about going and buying it. The gal who has it says she overheated it a while back (and hired a mechanic to fix the problem) but then it started missing (where she was advised it might be the coil packs, which are still unfixed I'm believing) but then it started making this noise. I'm wondering if it's something like the cam chain tensioner or is it something requiring a major tear down (e.g. piston slap).

Lincoln LS - Google Drive
Hi Kevin. There is no way to answer that question without having the car inspected by a qualified mechanic. And even then, a mechanic might not be able to answer it definitively without looking deeper than an inspection would normally go.
You should take the car for a full inspection by a good mechanic. If you aren't able to do that, then assume the worst. My personal opinion? It would be best to find another LS, unless you are willing to assume and pay for the worst.
Let us know how you make out and good luck.
 

kevinfish

New member
11
0
1
Hi Kevin. There is no way to answer that question without having the car inspected by a qualified mechanic. And even then, a mechanic might not be able to answer it definitively without looking deeper than an inspection would normally go.
You should take the car for a full inspection by a good mechanic. If you aren't able to do that, then assume the worst. My personal opinion? It would be best to find another LS, unless you are willing to assume and pay for the worst.
Let us know how you make out and good luck.
Having just finished working on a Chrysler 2.7L (which had, and are notorious for, timing chain/guide slap) and upon listening to it on a computer with better speakers, I'm pretty convinced its that. Do you know of any way, without totally dismantling, where I can tell if its the main timing chain or the cam-to-cam chains that's loose? For example, back in the old days, it used to be you could pull out a mechanical fuel pump and poke your finger in most "V" engines to feel how loose the chain was. Some now have inspection ports and other such tricks to tell (e.g. pull the oil filler cap and rotate the engine backwards while someone watches the cam to see how much slop there is before it starts turning backwards too).
 

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