Fuel Pump replacement - stuck

davidj03

Junior Member
I have a 2003 Lincoln Town Car signature with 60K miles. A few weeks ago, after driving for an hour, I pulled into a drive through. While waiting, the engine stumbled. Taking that as a sign to head for home right away I started driving and it stumbled and died after driving a few hundred yards, as though it was running out of gas. I towed it home, and read code p1237.

My diagnostic abilities are limited, so I just figured I would go after the most likely culprit and replace the fuel pump motor. I watched a few videos suggesting that the job could be done without disconnecting anything and replacing the motor as attached. Ideally I'd replace the whole fuel pump, but I'm out of work and am trying to do it as economically as possible.

I've replaced the fuel filter, drained the tank and have the car up on stands. I did disconnect the fuel line, to avoid flexing that too much. It seems I'll be able to pull the exhaust over enough to get the clearance to move the pump out. There is a connector located near the passenger wheel well which I'm going to leave connected.

There is a connector for the pressure sensor that is located above the tank behind a panel. I'm stuck here. I can reach it and wiggle it, but I can't tell how it is attached to the panel. I understand people often just cut those wires and splice them back together, but I am not crazy about that idea for a few reasons.

Can someone who has done this job explain how to get the connector loose so I can bring it below the panel to disconnect?
 

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Houston
Please read Buxter post #7. I think he has been down this path. I haven't done the pump the way you are doing It, I dropped the tank. But, it seems like this may be important.

 

davidj03

Junior Member
Please read Buxter post #7. I think he has been down this path. I haven't done the pump the way you are doing It, I dropped the tank. But, it seems like this may be important.

Thank you! It just so happened that today was the day I tried again. I had seen that post before, but looking at it again after struggling for a while it gave me the clue I needed to proceed. I almost cut the wrong harness believing that side to be the pressure sensor. In the photo, the correct wires to cut are the 3 wire harness. Once that is cut, it gives a lot more play to move the pump out, and then I removed the motor and just replaced that.

IMG_20200523_122614.jpg
 

All2kool

Senior Member
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Portland, OR
When I had to do the Fuel Pump on my 2004, I managed to get the assembly out of the tank just enough to swap in a new Airtex Fuel Pump only. I didn't disconnect anything. Car fired up as if nothing had ever been wrong.
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davidj03

Junior Member
When I had to do the Fuel Pump on my 2004, I managed to get the assembly out of the tank just enough to swap in a new Airtex Fuel Pump only. I didn't disconnect anything. Car fired up as if nothing had ever been wrong.
That's what I tried to do initially, but I couldn't get enough slack. cutting those wires made a big difference. I also disconnected the fuel line since I already had the tool from doing my intake in February. I just replaced the pump motor also.
 

davidj03

Junior Member
My car died again. After replacing the fuel pump motor, it started right up and ran well. I use a scangauge II, which provides for monitoring fuel pressure.

On initial startup, I was getting a fuel pressure of over 40. While cruising, my fuel pressure typically ran in the high 30s. Today I drove about 20 miles on the freeway, and it ran well. I stopped for a few hours, and when I started the car, I had a fuel pressure of 25. Concerned about this, I avoided the freeway. On the road it started to run rough and my fuel pressure dropped as low as 13.

At this point I parked the car and called for a ride. I have a pending code p1235.

I am tempted to try replacing the fuel pump driver module and the relay and see if that fixes the problem. Does anybody have any ideas?
 

wolf_walker

Junior Member
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Fuel filter should be replaced just as a matter of course, did you happen to peek in the tank to see if it was cruddy and/or examine the pickup filter on the fuel pump hanger? I don't know how the pump is driven off hand but a simple voltage check on it should suffice. Fuel pump relays are always a failure point as well.
 

davidj03

Junior Member
I replaced the fuel filter when I replaced the pump motor. The screen on the old one didn't seem cruddy, but no, I didn't get any look inside the tank as I didn't drop it.

I'm having trouble finding the part number for the FPDM, but when I do I'll replace that and the relay.
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