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First week with my Continental

Town

Senior Member
3,607
11
38
Ottawa Ontario Canada
Thread starter #22
Are you leasing it buying?
I am buying my Continental since I intend to keep it for 10 years. Looked at leasing a little, but it seemed more expensive for me and my salesman agreed. The cost of repairs will of course be a factor and if it proves less reliable than my Town Car (which I kept for 10 years and still perfect) I may need to reconsider. If problematic then I will change at the 4 year mark.

I don't need the latest and greatest so long as my car is well equipped and looking great.
 

blackhand1001

Junior Member
1
0
0
#24
Found out the power headrests in the rear outboard positions do not raise by power or manually. They just flip down either by power or manually.

Tried the AWD display in the dash. Surprised to find the car is powered by all 4 wheels when starting off, and the rear wheel drive diminishes after 30 KPH (19 MPH) and is only front wheel drive by 40 KPH (25 MPH) in dry summer weather. So now I know why the system works so well in the winter on other Lincolns.

Just turned on the lane keeping feature. Now set for warning (steering wheel vibration) and assist (move steering so car tracks center of lane). I have not noticed any difference so far and I have been on several roads with different markings, some had 3 lanes and no visible markings. So quite pleased so far.

Navigation works very well and is particularly easy to use. Some recent development in my area is visible on Google but not on my navigation system at all.

The collision assist feature shows a number of red lights where the HID display would be and sounds a loud noise and even brakes the car as you get close to a vehicle in front that is slowing unexpectedly without brake lights. A car cutting in front and accelerating has no effect.

So all these features that take some of the driving away from you actually just enhance the driving experience since they react so quickly and so well. I am surprised and happy so far.
Yeah, too many reviewers incorrectly say the Lincolns are using Haldex AWD. Ford actually makes their own in house AWD, And the Torque vectoring AWD option is actually another AWD system entirely, a collaboration between Ford and GKN Driveline.
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Town

Senior Member
3,607
11
38
Ottawa Ontario Canada
Thread starter #25
Yeah, too many reviewers incorrectly say the Lincolns are using Haldex AWD. Ford actually makes their own in house AWD, And the Torque vectoring AWD option is actually another AWD system entirely, a collaboration between Ford and GKN Driveline.
Yes Ford have evolved their AWD system for many years to become so awesome.

I thought the torque vectoring system on the 3 liter was basically the same as the 2.7 liter AWD but also includes much more technology for the torque and speed vectoring. The rear half shafts includes additional gearing outboard of the torque vectoring differential that can be applied when necessary to add speed to the outside rear wheel to help push the car through corners. However a user on another forum says you have to be "pushing" the car through the corners to see any advantage. Perhaps the system is more noticeable on slippery roads. I think the other torque vectoring systems on the rear axle just act like a limited slip differential with more control over slip, but no speed advantage.
 

Town

Senior Member
3,607
11
38
Ottawa Ontario Canada
Thread starter #26
The fuel economy and distance to empty do not work the same way as in my 2007 Town Car. The Continental calculates distance to empty after a fill-up based upon the average fuel economy of the last trip. The Town Car kept a rolling average over many hundreds of kilometers (not recorded anywhere a user could access) and used that to calculate distance to empty. The difference is very significant. Town Car used to do about 600 kilometers to empty while the Continental is well over 700 kilometers to empty on 4 liters less tank capacity.

Last week's trip averaged 7.9 liters per 100 kilometers (L/100K) while this weeks trip showed 7.6 L/100K so it is improving all the time. I have 1600 kilometers now so it is finished the break-in period but the Owner's Manual says not to measure fuel economy during break-in since it will improve after 2,000 or 3,000 kilometers.
 

Slick Fan

Senior Member
601
1
0
Utah
#28
My front passenger inside door e-latch switch broke after a few days of use. The new part finally came in this morning and my dealer installed it immediately. So all is well now.
Is the e-latch switch connected to the button that opens the door from the inside?
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Town

Senior Member
3,607
11
38
Ottawa Ontario Canada
Thread starter #29
Is the e-latch switch connected to the button that opens the door from the inside?
Yes, the e-latch switch is the button mounted into the interior door pull and feels like a switch to release the e-latch holding the door closed. On my car is went dead feeling after a few days. The e-latch switch on the outside door handle is a bigger button but feels and operates the same way.

My wife and I love the system when it is working.
 

Town

Senior Member
3,607
11
38
Ottawa Ontario Canada
Thread starter #32
On a little trip Saturday I tried out some other gauge settings. The speedometer setting gives digital speedometer but moves distance to empty from the gas gauge to the left display, and eliminates the other gauges, so I did not use that setting. The Speedometer with fuel management setting in the gauges options has the current fuel economy in left of screen and a digital speedometer in the center and the analogue speedometer in its normal space but just the current speed segment. The distance to empty moved back to the fuel gauge position that I like. The right display can be anything in the fuel trip and distance menu. The digital speedometer shows a gold coloured display which disappears when cruise control is selected to allow for the image of a car in front (if in range). So all the other instruments (tach, temp and boost) are no longer visible. I am still using that setup for the time being.

I have used the current fuel economy gauge before but not for long. On this trip I got to see how the fuel economy changed in different conditions. Of particular interest is the lower fuel usage when following a car at a safe distance imposed by the Adaptive speed control. The fuel usage gauge usually points at the 7.5 liters per 100 kilometer division and when a car is in front and the car image displays the gauge registers well below that mark. So slip streaming works even at a safe distance.

Fuel economy for this trip was 7.3 liters per 100 kilometers and the average for 2,650 kilometers since buying the car is 10.5 liters per 100 kilometers. It was registering over 20 liters per 100 kilometers when I bought it. So the Eco-Boost does give you excellent performance and outstanding fuel economy when you want, but perhaps not at the same time. When i purchased the car it had over 20 liters per 100 kilometers showing in the trip 2 display with just 12 kilometers short of the total distance travelled on the car.

My car has not used any oil in the 2,650 kilometers so far.
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