Does the Navigator actually tow well? anybody have first hand experience?

Sweetb7

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We are STILL deciding whether or not to purchase the 2020 navigator L black label but my father in law keeps telling my husband he doesn't think it can tow well. We are looking at a 33ft travel trailer 7600 pounds (dry weight is 6193) with a hitch weight of 763. My F.I.L said this to my husband "Any trailer you pull needs to be at least a 2500 or 3500 truck. Not any 1500 normal. Not even a Suburban unless they make a 2500 suburban".

I don't know what any of these numbers mean....but based off the trailer specs it seems the navi should pull it no problem. My F.I.L is under the impression that the trailer is so big and it will "sway like crazy" and cause us to crash..
 

bbf2530

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We are STILL deciding whether or not to purchase the 2020 navigator L black label but my father in law keeps telling my husband he doesn't think it can tow well. We are looking at a 33ft travel trailer 7600 pounds (dry weight is 6193) with a hitch weight of 763. My F.I.L said this to my husband "Any trailer you pull needs to be at least a 2500 or 3500 truck. Not any 1500 normal. Not even a Suburban unless they make a 2500 suburban".

I don't know what any of these numbers mean....but based off the trailer specs it seems the navi should pull it no problem. My F.I.L is under the impression that the trailer is so big and it will "sway like crazy" and cause us to crash..
Hi Sweetb. When equipped with the Trailer Towing package, you can tow your 7,600 pound travel trailer.

The 2020 Navigator L ratings are 8,100 pounds for the 4x4, and 8,400 pounds for the 4x4. And the Towing Package includes Trailer Sway Control, among other features.

Here is the 2020 Lincoln Towing Guide, so you can verify my information and show your well meaning but mistaken father-in-law ;): https://www.fleet.ford.com/content/...et/towing-guides/2020_Lincoln_TowingGuide.pdf

Hope this information helps and good luck.
 

rubyinla

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Well, it all depends. According to the manual you must order the Navigator with the optional heavy duty trailer package. Then you max out at 8,600 pounds.
You can download a manual here, or wherever you are comfortable doing it... https://www.fleet.ford.com/parts-service/resources/owner-manuals/
Then go to page 325 under Towing. Then go to page 307 under Load Carrying. You'll find GAWR, GCWR on the vehicle.

The limit for the hitch is, as close as I can find, 620 pounds. What is not known is if that limit is with or without a weight distribution hitch.

So, there are a bunch of other numbers that come into play. I built a spread sheet to figure them out to see which trailer I could tow with our suv. You might find that the combined weight of your loaded Navigator and the loaded weight of the trailer could exceed it's GCWR.
.

One thing for sure, you can expect to stop every 250 miles or less to refuel. My bet, 7 to 9 mpg in the mountains and 11 mpg on flat land.
"For best overall vehicle and engine performance, premium fuel with an octane rating of 91 or higher is recommended."

I can only imagine what your FIL is referring to, but you WILL need a weight distribution hitch with built in sway control. Around $500 or less (look at the chain ones by Andersen - my next one, much lighter). The distribution hitch will help shift the tail weight to the front suspension. The sway control will stop the trailer from swaying, which your FIL is referring to. The electronic sway control built in is nice but if it's really needed it will scare the be bejesus out of you. The trailer sway control stops swaying before the electronic one is needed. Ask me how I know. Your FIL is being conservative and looking out for you.

Another option:
The Ford Expedition goes up to 9300 pounds, properly equipped.
TRAILER TOWING SELECTOR - Ford https://www.ford.com/cmslibs/content/dam/brand_ford/en_us/brand/resources/general/

Have fun :)
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AKentPhoto

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If towing is the goal I'd stick with an Expedition... Slightly stiffer suspension and non geriatric drive modes are much preferred imho. If you stick with a Platinum the only thing you are really missing out on is the front seats.

The real question is how much other stuff and people do you plan on hauling? Those numbers are without passengers and stuff in the truck. If you are only taking 4 people and nothing in the truck (load everything in the trailer) you should be good. You will most definitely need a weight distribution hitch as stated. I'd also look into some sumo springs. They are basically an extra bump stop that goes in the middle of the spring that will help prevent rear droop. I will be towing a lot with mine once work gets going again...
 

dlcorbett

Junior Member
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As far as experience with towing, i have none but to get a good idea of towing, i would hop over to an expy forum, theres plenty of towing threads with pros, cons, and tips.

If the trailer is 7600lbs dry, the nav wil be able to handle it with the tow pkg, just be mindful the comfortability limit(swaying, component wear, brake and suspension performance, etc.). When considering towing, you also have to consider your passengers and their gear as well. The truck itself can handle way more weight than 8100lbs, but then you start losing the comfortability of the trucks driving character. If your gonna be towing the trailer over 15k miles, its probably best to get a pickup, but if its once or twice a year or about 5k miles, the nav should be more than enough. An expedition max maybe a better option to look at well, without a huge loss of luxury. Like stated above, the L is able to pull 8100lbs.

The 2500/3500 truck statement is somewhat true, you dnt need a 2500 series pickup to tow your trailer, a 1500 will do. However, if you need to tow with 6 to 8 passengers, a 2500 chevy suburban will be a bit safer, but they dont make those anymore. 1500, 2500, 3500, and above correlate to a work trucks abilities. An easy terms, a ford f150 is a 1500 series truck and can tow about 12k lbs / haul 4k lbs, a f250 is a 2500 series truck and can tow about 15k lbs / haul 6k lbs, and the numbers go up for each series of truck(f350 and f450 can tow more than 30k lbs properly equipped). If you go the pickup truck route, the only pickup truck even remotely close to the ride and interior comfort of the nav is a ram 1500. No full size suv can tow over 9k but an expy, the others including gm, toyota and nissan max out at about 8400lbs, but their towing abilities are somewhat of a mixed bag excluding the gm utes.

In conclusion, honestly, the nav is more than good enough, but if you feel its to close to the line of capability, look at a expy platinum. The 2020s seem to be very reliable outside the recalls. Also, the gm utes were redone and come out in 2 to 4 mnths, if your already looking, why not look at those too. They will now have almost the exact same footprint as the fords in regards to exterior dimension and passenger space, will have irs, and the large v8 is available in all the utes, in their highest trim. They tow less than the nav and expy, but will come with available rear load leveling, something the tow communities loathe about the nav and expy currently. Happy hunting.
 

rubyinla

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Attached is a clip from my spread sheet. I'm sure you can make your own with this as a model. With the numbers I'm seeing around the internet it seems you would have about a 1000 pounds reserve weight after loading up your trailer.

Couple of notes:
1. 4x4 reduces your max weight
2. You MUST have the Heavy Duty Trailer package.
3. How much weight you have on the axles can only be found when you weight the combined Nav & Trailer
4. Watch for "weight creep".... that's where things that you "really" need just keep accumulating :)
5. All weight behind the rear wheels is tongue weight.
6. Never travel with water in the tanks and always dump the grey / black water. No point in pulling that. Water weighs 8 pounds a gallon.

So, the answer is, by the numbers, you can do it with a 1000 pounds to spare. Now you have to ask yourself if you are comfortable with that margin.
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Sweetb7

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Attached is a clip from my spread sheet. I'm sure you can make your own with this as a model. With the numbers I'm seeing around the internet it seems you would have about a 1000 pounds reserve weight after loading up your trailer.

Couple of notes:
1. 4x4 reduces your max weight
2. You MUST have the Heavy Duty Trailer package.
3. How much weight you have on the axles can only be found when you weight the combined Nav & Trailer
4. Watch for "weight creep".... that's where things that you "really" need just keep accumulating :)
5. All weight behind the rear wheels is tongue weight.
6. Never travel with water in the tanks and always dump the grey / black water. No point in pulling that. Water weighs 8 pounds a gallon.

So, the answer is, by the numbers, you can do it with a 1000 pounds to spare. Now you have to ask yourself if you are comfortable with that margin.
Thank you so much!!! Amazing Info!!!
 
At 64 yrs of age, I've done a lot of towing through the years, with many different passenger type vehicles/light trucks and various payloads. I have 2001 & 2006 Nav's, and can say from experience they are both masters of towing. Towing has always been a primary focus of the Lincoln Navigator. Navigators are many things to many people, but my simple analogy, if you will, Navigator's are the ideal luxury estate wagon for people with money, living in rural areas that own horses and such.

I collect old vehicles and bought a great 1970 Ford F250 in Northern California. My bother in-law had it and gave it to me for a great price. I got a U-Haul trailer, loaded it up and towed it down to So California where I live. It was a trip of about 450 miles over flat land and steep mountains with many curves.

The trailer/payload was a bit of a challenge given the tow vehicle vs towed vehicle ratio, almost 1:1. The one thing so many detractors complain about is the Navigator's weight, but what the morons don't realize, for a tow vehicle weight is your friend . Other SUV's in the Navigator's class are toys when it comes to towing. The Navigator is a great tow vehicle and is heavy - a coincidence? Maybe that's what Ford had in mind.

I didn't have an electric brake except that on the trailer. The brake would react to the pressure on the hitch. Not idea but it worked nonetheless All in all, the Navigator handled it quite well and I was confident the whole trip. The Nav's brakes are most impressive, but I was even more impressed with the air suspension, always keeping the trailer hitch at the right level which was critical to prevent fishtailing.

I underestimated the truck/trailer combo's weight. If I had to do it again, I would use a bigger/better trailer with a load leveling hitch and hook up the Nav's dash mounted trailer electric braking controls.

FWIW
 

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