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Did Lincoln offer special services like Cadillac did?

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luxur.review

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Did Lincoln offer any services like Cadillac’s “Roadside Service” which a serviceman would come out and change a tire, tow it away if needed, pay for your meals and a hotel room if it was serious, and bring a loaner. Or Cadillacs “Gold Key Delivery”? Just curious, from what I’ve heard, owning a new Cadillac was really nice.
 

Black Label

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My Navigator comes with Roadside Assistance. Haven't had to use it. I wouldn't ever buy a Cadillac because of that, anyway, because I think they are gaudy with the hearse style tail lights.
 

bbf2530

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Did Lincoln offer any services like Cadillac’s “Roadside Service” which a serviceman would come out and change a tire, tow it away if needed, pay for your meals and a hotel room if it was serious, and bring a loaner. Or Cadillacs “Gold Key Delivery”? Just curious, from what I’ve heard, owning a new Cadillac was really nice.

Hi luxur. Yes, Lincoln has offered "Lincoln Roadside Assistance", consisting of complementary roadside assistance/service, towing and other amenities, for many years now. For 2013+ model year vehicles, it is for the lifetime ownership of the original owner.

Good luck.
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jkeaton

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Well darn, I was thinking something much more elaborate and personal than just "roadside assistance", as in the actual lincoln service person. Not your typical independent service/towing. Thanks for setting me straight guys,
 
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Corsart

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I think Lincoln's "Concierge service" is one of the industries most gracious service for luxury car owners. In addition to 24/7 roadside, they'll pick up and deliver your car for service (with a wash), and there's always those cheerful live people available via phone to help with what ever question you might have about your car or it's ownership.
 

Black Label

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Well darn, I was thinking something much more elaborate and personal than just "roadside assistance", as in the actual lincoln service person. Not your typical independent service/towing. Thanks for setting me straight guys,
Maybe the Cadillac folks come out and fix your car and bring espresso, etc. :ROFLMAO:
 

bbf2530

Junior Member
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Well darn, I was thinking something much more elaborate and personal than just "roadside assistance", as in the actual lincoln service person. Not your typical independent service/towing. Thanks for setting me straight guys,

Hi jkeaton. I was only giving the basics (not sure if you were joking or not...lol).

Then there is the Lincoln Concierge Service and all of its amenities, as Corsart mentioned.

Good luck. :)

EDIT- Had typed this up, but was called away before I could hit send, so had not seen the last posts by you and BL before posting it just now. 🙃
 

luxur.review

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Thanks for the all of the answers guys! American luxury cars were some of the best in the business back in the day and I like to learn how the owners were treated, the automotive press didn’t/doesn’t like American cars but I think they’re better than that.
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Corsart

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Thanks for the all of the answers guys! American luxury cars were some of the best in the business back in the day and I like to learn how the owners were treated, the automotive press didn’t/doesn’t like American cars but I think they’re better than that.
Ok, so your nick intrigues me: You're asking for more than personal reasons, yes?

To answer your question...and it depends on your definition of both " good" and "treatment", I recall both were excellent of my parents and their luxury cars, back in the '60's and thru, IDK, about the '90's, maybe Y2K? Back then, it was about relationships, the suburban dealerships we patronized were a part of town and relied on the neighbors word of mouth for their survival, so CS was paramount. The dealers were also small, family owned businesses, not the mega franchises we often see today, so there was clear, direct accountability. Likewise, the salesmen were lifers, my dad worked with the same guy for every purchase over many years. And, he knew the product and the customer.

All that changed about the time that the internet took hold. Things like "Relationships" and "Long term" and "Professionalism", to say nothing of "Accountability" slowly eroded, replaced by transience and the emphasis on cost/price that all that information and (usually mindless) opinion bring.

My recollection isn't that the automotive press didn't "like" American iron, as much as they accurately noted the emphasis on passing fashion and planned obsolescence over engineering and QC. I recall with some anticipation Motor Trend's annual "King of the Hill" comparo between the Lincoln Mark and Cad Eldo., and I recently linked a comparo between the current "King" SUV's where our beloved Navigator came in first and the Escalade came in second, both ahead of the drab yet incomprehensibly popular MB and BMW.
 
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luxur.review

New member
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Ok, so your nick intrigues me: You're asking for more than personal reasons, yes?

To answer your question...and it depends on your definition of both " good" and "treatment", I recall both were excellent of my parents and their luxury cars, back in the '60's and thru, IDK, about the '90's, maybe Y2K? Back then, it was about relationships, the suburban dealerships we patronized were a part of town and relied on the neighbors word of mouth for their survival, so CS was paramount. The dealers were also small, family owned businesses, not the mega franchises we often see today, so there was clear, direct accountability. Likewise, the salesmen were lifers, my dad worked with the same guy for every purchase over many years. And, he knew the product and the customer.

All that changed about the time that the internet took hold. Things like "Relationships" and "Long term" and "Professionalism", to say nothing of "Accountability" slowly eroded, replaced by transience and the emphasis on cost/price that all that information and (usually mindless) opinion bring.

My recollection isn't that the automotive press didn't "like" American iron, as much as they accurately noted the emphasis on passing fashion and planned obsolescence over engineering and QC. I recall with some anticipation Motor Trend's annual "King of the Hill" comparo between the Lincoln Mark and Cad Eldo., and I recently linked a comparo between the current "King" SUV's where our beloved Navigator came in first and the Escalade came in second, both ahead of the drab yet incomprehensibly popular MB and BMW.
A lot of luxury car dealerships offer things like washing your car, travel rewards, espresso bars, really nice waiting are etc. what would be the 1980s version of that?
Also, my name is the same as my YouTube channel, I have reviewed my Lincoln Tc on there.
I admire the original owners of older Cadillacs and Lincoln’s. They were part of the Greatest Generation, they were wealthy, posh individuals. I try to in some ways relive their lifestyle. Old Cadillac promotional videos do a better job at providing info than old Lincoln promos. The automotive press just calls them old people cars.
 
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Corsart

Well-known member
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A lot of luxury car dealerships offer things like washing your car, travel rewards, espresso bars, really nice waiting are etc. what would be the 1980s version of that?
The 1980's version of espresso bars was competence.

Our cars always came back washed, the realization that customers appreciate a clean car isn't a new discovery. All that other stuff is either a distraction from bad/expensive service, or worse, a reflection of the manufacturers (low) opinion of their customers and what actually passes as "Luxury" these days.

Folks who can afford luxury recognize the value in competence and professionalism, it's typically how they got to afford "Luxury" (without the need for subsidized leases) in the first place. When I go to a dealership I want to interact with knowledgeable, competent people. I can make my own espresso at home.
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luxur.review

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The 1980's version of espresso bars was competence.

Our cars always came back washed, the realization that customers appreciate a clean car isn't a new discovery. All that other stuff is either a distraction from bad/expensive service, or worse, a reflection of the manufacturers (low) opinion of their customers and what actually passes as "Luxury" these days.

Folks who can afford luxury recognize the value in competence and professionalism, it's typically how they got to afford "Luxury" (without the need for subsidized leases) in the first place. When I go to a dealership I want to interact with knowledgeable, competent people. I can make my own espresso at home.
What car do you drive? How old are you?
 

bbf2530

Junior Member
2,589
1,379
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A lot of luxury car dealerships offer things like washing your car, travel rewards, espresso bars, really nice waiting are etc. what would be the 1980s version of that?
Also, my name is the same as my YouTube channel, I have reviewed my Lincoln Tc on there.
I admire the original owners of older Cadillacs and Lincoln’s. They were part of the Greatest Generation, they were wealthy, posh individuals. I try to in some ways relive their lifestyle. Old Cadillac promotional videos do a better job at providing info than old Lincoln promos. The automotive press just calls them old people cars.

Hi luxur. In addition to the information Corsart, others and I have provided, be aware that: Lincoln/Lincoln Dealerships also offers car washes when the car is serviced (or anytime/on demand, for Black Label vehicles), travel and other rewards, espresso/coffee bars etc. etc. etc..

EDIT - In fact, even the Ford Dealers in my areas offer an espresso/coffee/tea/hot chocolate "bar". For those who find it to be "luxury", it seems to be pretty standard equipment in almost any manufacturers Dealership.

Now, the size/quality/cleanliness of the Dealership itself, the waiting rooms, service areas etc., depends on the Dealership itself and can obviously vary by Dealership and employee pride. And whether an individual Dealership performs a car wash when the vehicle is serviced also depends on how dedicated the Dealership is. If we want it washed and they forget, the best advice is to remind them.

And in reality, there is nothing wrong with "old people cars". Heck, "old people" buy cars too. A manufacturer just needs to be sure they build vehicles that appeal to as many buyers as possible.

Good luck.
 
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luxur.review

New member
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Hi luxur. In addition to the information Corsart, others and I have provided, be aware that: Lincoln/Lincoln Dealerships also offers car washes when the car is serviced (or anytime/on demand, for Black Label vehicles), travel and other rewards, espresso/coffee bars etc. etc. etc..

The size/quality/cleanliness of the Dealership itself, the waiting rooms, service areas etc., depends on the Dealership itself and can obviously vary by Dealership and employee pride. And whether an individual Dealership performs a car wash when the vehicle is serviced also depends on how dedicated the Dealership is. If we want it washed and they forget, the best advice is to remind them.

And in reality, there is nothing wrong with "old people cars". Heck, "old people" buy cars too. A manufacturer just needs to be sure they build vehicles that appeal to as many buyers as possible.

Good luck.
Someone who is 65 years old probably has 45-50 years of car buying experience, so they know quite a bit.
 

bbf2530

Junior Member
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Someone who is 65 years old probably has 45-50 years of car buying experience, so they know quite a bit.

Hi luxur. Not sure how the 65 age was determined to be part of the conversation? Experience derived through age/longevity can certainly be beneficial. However, many people buy many vehicles, never learn a thing, and make the same mistakes over and over. ;)

So age can be just a number, on either side of the equation.
 
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