Aviator Horror Story - Help

Tack30

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I was one of the most excited Aviator pre-order guys out there in 2019 and unfortunately my experience with TWO brand new Aviators (2020 Reserve & 2021 Reserve) have been a disaster so I wanted to share my story. Very interested to hear if anyone else has had similar experiences and what Lincoln was able to do about it.

The experience that put me over the top with my 2020 Aviator was the exploding panoramic sunroof (pictures attached). Luckily I was going about 5mph and without being struck, the sunroof combusted and it was the loudest explosion I've ever heard. Thankful my two young children weren't in the car with me. After about 6 weeks going back and forth with Lincoln they finally offered enough trade-in allowance to buy the car and get me into a comparable 2021 Aviator that "has the kinks worked out". I've been driving the 2021 Aviator Reserve now for about 3 weeks and it broke down in the middle of the road yesterday with a "Drive Control Fault" message. I'm ready to throw in the towel...

Here are other problems I've had:
  • Twice for a bad front left speaker, which it was finally replaced (ironically the brand new Aviator loaner I was given has the same speaker problem).
  • The backup camera randomly turns blue and prevents you from actually seeing what’s behind you.
  • The “slow close” hood wasn’t shutting so it had to be reinstalled.
  • The hood was fixed but now it shakes when I’m traveling over 60mph.
  • The car alarm has been triggered 31 times while either sitting in my garage or in my office parking lot.
  • I’ve taken the car in for software updates, but have yet been able to get the Phone as Key feature to function. Every time the Lincoln concierge takes me through about 10 steps and then says go to the dealer. (Which I have done without any luck)
    • The 2021 Phone as Key does work fairly well but never worked with 2020
 

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jberry

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Very scary to hear this. We are on our 2nd Aviator as well. We bought a 2020 that instantly had major issues: misaligned driver door, misaligned rear hatch, auto stop fault, passenger seat malfunction, windshield wiper, hard shift from 1st to 2nd, and rear diff major vibration. This was enough to complete the lemon law process through Lincoln to get a comparable 2021 Aviator replacement. Well we didnt even get it out of the lot before we had issues; clicking noise in suspension when you accelerate and when you hit the brakes, the driver door is misaligned, and now the auto hold has a fault. This aviator has 170 miles on it.
 

Tack30

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Very scary to hear this. We are on our 2nd Aviator as well. We bought a 2020 that instantly had major issues: misaligned driver door, misaligned rear hatch, auto stop fault, passenger seat malfunction, windshield wiper, hard shift from 1st to 2nd, and rear diff major vibration. This was enough to complete the lemon law process through Lincoln to get a comparable 2021 Aviator replacement. Well we didnt even get it out of the lot before we had issues; clicking noise in suspension when you accelerate and when you hit the brakes, the driver door is misaligned, and now the auto hold has a fault. This aviator has 170 miles on it.
I can share in the frustration and sorry to hear. What are you/Lincoln going to do with the 2021 Aviator?
______________________________
 

mapkos13

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Very scary to hear this. We are on our 2nd Aviator as well. We bought a 2020 that instantly had major issues: misaligned driver door, misaligned rear hatch, auto stop fault, passenger seat malfunction, windshield wiper, hard shift from 1st to 2nd, and rear diff major vibration. This was enough to complete the lemon law process through Lincoln to get a comparable 2021 Aviator replacement. Well we didnt even get it out of the lot before we had issues; clicking noise in suspension when you accelerate and when you hit the brakes, the driver door is misaligned, and now the auto hold has a fault. This aviator has 170 miles on it.
Jberry I’m about to go through a return/swap under Ohio lemon law for two issues. I also have a 2020 but was interested when you stated they offered you the same but a 2021. Can you share more about that? Did they charge you more or just do a direct swap?

Tack30- my hood shakes something fierce and by my service concierge’s look when I asked him about it I believe it is a known manufacturing “fault.” It’s how’s it’s designed so I don’t believe there is any fix for it. Terrible to hear about the other issues.
 

jberry

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Jberry I’m about to go through a return/swap under Ohio lemon law for two issues. I also have a 2020 but was interested when you stated they offered you the same but a 2021. Can you share more about that? Did they charge you more or just do a direct swap?

Tack30- my hood shakes something fierce and by my service concierge’s look when I asked him about it I believe it is a known manufacturing “fault.” It’s how’s it’s designed so I don’t believe there is any fix for it. Terrible to hear about the other issues.
So the short answer is yes they replaced the vehicle at "no cost" to us.

Long answer; After going back and forth with Texas lemon laws and the options available we opted for the replacement of the same vehicle rather than a buyback. The reason for this was we did not want to lose out on any trade equity from the previous car we used to buy the 1st aviator. This was very difficult to explain the the Lincoln dealership who was pushing us to just do the buyback and than start from scratch (my theory is that they wanted us to choose that route so they could have a "new car deal" and make more$$ go figure right). Here is a simple explanation why we chose the replacement option; Lets say we buy a $70,000 car and we traded in a car that was worth $40,000. We as the buyers would pay the tax on only the difference ($30,000) due to trade equity and here in Texas with the tax rate of .0625 that would be $1,875. So with a buy back we would get what we paid for the car and what we paid in taxes (and all fees) which would for easy math be $31,875. Are you following?

Now lets take that $31,875 and go buy the same $70,000 dollar since we no longer have the car because it was a lemon... Again, this is the way the dealer will try and talk you into doing but hear me out first. You buy the $70,000 car put down the $31,875 and now its time for taxes and since you have no trade equity you are liable for the full taxed amount of $70,000 which with the Texas tax rate it will be $4,375. The difference to buy the same car is an additional cost of $2,500. Dealer's happy, Lincoln's happy, and you are out money.

Another reason we went with replacement is because according to the lemon law in Texas which is the worst in the nation the Manufacturer is responsible for replacing the vehicle with a comparable model and features..... well we all on this site know the many different options Lincoln offers and to find one with the same features 2021 changed option packages and we found ourselves in a 2021 model with a MSRP close to $4k above our 2020.

Things to mention for the process. Start with the Lincoln concierge service who will start the lemon process and about a week later will approve or deny. Once approved you will than be talking with a Lincoln "Buyback specialist" where they will give you the three option 1. Buyback 2. Replacement 3. Repair and give $1500-$3000 for your troubles. Another thing to mention but is based on your state is there may be ( not our case because we had such low mileage) usage fees which is a charge for each mile you drove the vehicle while it was working properly.

P.S. Our sales person and the service department were fantastic and its a shame Lincoln is producing these cars with so many issues. But I can say this; Lincoln will work to get it fixed. (with a little urge from the state lemon laws)

Hope this helps!

-Jake Berry
281.755.5799 Call if you have any more questions
 

mapkos13

Member
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8
Now lets take that $31,875 and go buy the same $70,000 dollar since we no longer have the car because it was a lemon... Again, this is the way the dealer will try and talk you into doing but hear me out first. You buy the $70,000 car put down the $31,875 and now its time for taxes and since you have no trade equity you are liable for the full taxed amount of $70,000 which with the Texas tax rate it will be $4,375. The difference to buy the same car is an additional cost of $2,500. Dealer's happy, Lincoln's happy, and you are out money.
This is great info. Thanks for sharing. I know in Ohio they tax you $5k of your trade. Anything over is untaxed. They, like Texas however will tax you the full amount regardless of the down payment so I would be in the same boat as you were.

I actually received a message from service and they believe the issue is a leaky gasket on the fuel pump. This makes more sense given the type of smell I had. This is where it gets interesting. By law, I’ve qualified for two of the four reasons you can send back the vehicle. They’ve had it for 30+ days and it’s been in the shop more than three times for the same reason. I would think that whether they fix it or not that doesn’t change the fact that I am entitled to turn in the vehicle at this point.

If I believe this will fix the issue then perhaps I continue with the process and take the ”cash to keep” offer and at least get something for my troubles. The vehicle has given me no issues other than this and a flaky touchscreen which they’re replacing.

I’m waiting to hear back from the concierge as to the approval. Should be cut and dry. We’ll see....

Thabid again.
______________________________
 

jberry

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This is great info. Thanks for sharing. I know in Ohio they tax you $5k of your trade. Anything over is untaxed. They, like Texas however will tax you the full amount regardless of the down payment so I would be in the same boat as you were.

I actually received a message from service and they believe the issue is a leaky gasket on the fuel pump. This makes more sense given the type of smell I had. This is where it gets interesting. By law, I’ve qualified for two of the four reasons you can send back the vehicle. They’ve had it for 30+ days and it’s been in the shop more than three times for the same reason. I would think that whether they fix it or not that doesn’t change the fact that I am entitled to turn in the vehicle at this point.

If I believe this will fix the issue then perhaps I continue with the process and take the ”cash to keep” offer and at least get something for my troubles. The vehicle has given me no issues other than this and a flaky touchscreen which they’re replacing.

I’m waiting to hear back from the concierge as to the approval. Should be cut and dry. We’ll see....

Thabid again.
Correct as far as you are entitled to proceeding even if issue is fixed. And ig you are happy with the car after the repair than yeah take the money and if it gives you issues you still have the option. However, we did not choose that option so I am not sure what "legal" rights if any you would be giving up with taking the 'cash to keep".
 

dryla

New member
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Oh Boy!! We are in the same predicament as our 2020 Aviator has a front end "howl" when traveling over 45mph. The car has been at the dealership since October 19, 2020. To their credit, they have tried adjusting the hood, the right side head light and even replaced the right side A pillar moulding to no avail. The dealership appears to have spent a lot of time trying to figure this issue out and did not know what to do next. We, therefore started through the Client Relations process and, today, Lincoln called to say they have approved the replacement/buyback of the vehicle. I definitely plan to take the replacement of a 2021 - with exactly the same options - unless there is a good reason not to do so. I will be getting that phone call from the "specialist" on January 19th. I did finance some of the cost of the car through Lincoln Financial so I am hoping I can just continue with the 0.9% loan as I now have it. Any suggestions before the "phone call" will greatly be appreciated.
 

Garrett7864

New member
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0
1
Toledo Oh
So the short answer is yes they replaced the vehicle at "no cost" to us.

Long answer; After going back and forth with Texas lemon laws and the options available we opted for the replacement of the same vehicle rather than a buyback. The reason for this was we did not want to lose out on any trade equity from the previous car we used to buy the 1st aviator. This was very difficult to explain the the Lincoln dealership who was pushing us to just do the buyback and than start from scratch (my theory is that they wanted us to choose that route so they could have a "new car deal" and make more$$ go figure right). Here is a simple explanation why we chose the replacement option; Lets say we buy a $70,000 car and we traded in a car that was worth $40,000. We as the buyers would pay the tax on only the difference ($30,000) due to trade equity and here in Texas with the tax rate of .0625 that would be $1,875. So with a buy back we would get what we paid for the car and what we paid in taxes (and all fees) which would for easy math be $31,875. Are you following?

Now lets take that $31,875 and go buy the same $70,000 dollar since we no longer have the car because it was a lemon... Again, this is the way the dealer will try and talk you into doing but hear me out first. You buy the $70,000 car put down the $31,875 and now its time for taxes and since you have no trade equity you are liable for the full taxed amount of $70,000 which with the Texas tax rate it will be $4,375. The difference to buy the same car is an additional cost of $2,500. Dealer's happy, Lincoln's happy, and you are out money.

Another reason we went with replacement is because according to the lemon law in Texas which is the worst in the nation the Manufacturer is responsible for replacing the vehicle with a comparable model and features..... well we all on this site know the many different options Lincoln offers and to find one with the same features 2021 changed option packages and we found ourselves in a 2021 model with a MSRP close to $4k above our 2020.

Things to mention for the process. Start with the Lincoln concierge service who will start the lemon process and about a week later will approve or deny. Once approved you will than be talking with a Lincoln "Buyback specialist" where they will give you the three option 1. Buyback 2. Replacement 3. Repair and give $1500-$3000 for your troubles. Another thing to mention but is based on your state is there may be ( not our case because we had such low mileage) usage fees which is a charge for each mile you drove the vehicle while it was working properly.

P.S. Our sales person and the service department were fantastic and its a shame Lincoln is producing these cars with so many issues. But I can say this; Lincoln will work to get it fixed. (with a little urge from the state lemon laws)

Hope this helps!

-Jake Berry
281.755.5799 Call if you have any more questions
Jake, I also have a 2020 Aviator which has been in the shop for 5 weeks and counting for replacement of an engine cylinder head. This was my 3rd Lincoln, and 4th overall Ford product after moving away from Chrysler and GM. Prior to getting the Aviator, I had a 2016 MKX which was sabotaged by a disgruntled mechanic. He drained out most of the oil, and then I put 3000 miles on it with cross country trip from Toledo Ohio, to Alabama, and back. It took 2 weeks to fix that one, also by replacing a head. So I was not blaming Lincoln per se. Now I've had it with this long delay. And it has also shown those "power-train faults", that cannot be duplicated at the shop. And it "seems" to be fine after those faults. But I wonder if next time it just barfs the gears.
Anyway I am keenly interested in the Lemon Law tactic. I did that once with a Chrysler Minivan years ago, and it was not very pretty financially. I was given back "trade-in" value for the lemon, and charged for mileage I had put on it, so I lost out the difference between what I paid out to get it and the trade-in value, which was many thousands. So I am not looking forward to repeating that, because I see the trade-in value for my $74K Aviator is about $55K. Ouch to the tune of $19K. I will not accept that. They'll just have to fix the dam thing!

SOO, my question to you is (in your detailed example) did you get any credit for the $40K from the trade-in? I'm hoping you were only out the tax difference between tax on $31K and tax on $70K. Don't get me wrong, that is significant, but at least it is only a difference of $2400. How much do you think if I'd get back if I just said "I'm done", give me back all my money minus mileage, and I'll get something else, non Ford/Lincoln. FYI thinking a Mercedes instead.
Garrett Scott at garrett.scott2@bex.net 419 346 2410
 
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