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2010 MKS-- is 91 Octane OK?

Just bought 2010 MKS with 60K miles. Previous owner only ever ran 87 octane. Personally, I have always avoided the low octane and opt for the mid (89) or premium (91..) . When I asked him about it, he said something about "the computer won't credit you for the higher octane." Not sure what that meant...
Bottom line: will I hurt anything if I run 89 or higher? (don't want to burn out any sensors or ? by using the higher grade. Daily driver, but mostly on the highway (40mi +).
thanks!
USAF (Ret'd)
 
sorry; should've mentioned. I have the 3.7
(I've seen "N/A" a few times...what's that stand for?)

Also, any thoughts on "non-ethanol" fuel? Have a station right across street that sells no-eth gas. Will was told a few yrs ago I should run a tank of non-ethanol in all my cars every once in a while. ((have a new John Deere zero-turn and that's all I'll use it her)) Thanks again!
 

SGilbert

Senior Member
714
38
28
South Bend, IN
FWIW, my 3.5 EcoBoost has only been fed 10% ethanol 87 octane for 81k miles, and I have had no problems. Occasionally, a bit of knocking when the tranny didn't downshift when it was supposed to.
Every once in awhile, I 'get on it' hard to burn out whatever might be in there. :)
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bbf2530

Junior Member
483
98
28
Just bought 2010 MKS with 60K miles. Previous owner only ever ran 87 octane. Personally, I have always avoided the low octane and opt for the mid (89) or premium (91..) . When I asked him about it, he said something about "the computer won't credit you for the higher octane." Not sure what that meant...
Bottom line: will I hurt anything if I run 89 or higher? (don't want to burn out any sensors or ? by using the higher grade. Daily driver, but mostly on the highway (40mi +).
thanks!
USAF (Ret'd)
Hi dnalex. You can find verifying information on what fuel types to use in your Owners Manual. If you did not get the Owners Manual when you purchased your MKS, you can download the PDF version here: Your Lincoln Ownership Experience Begins Here

Click on "Support", then "Download owners manual". After you download the PDF, check in the Index under "Fuel".

Hope this information helps and good luck.
 

CARR142

Member

bbf2530

Junior Member
483
98
28
Hi danalex. Just some additional explanation: N/A is "Normally Aspirated". That means an engine with no turbos or supercharger.

Good luck.
 

bbf2530

Junior Member
483
98
28
Hi danalex. I can not stress this enough...Please check your Owners Manual for the correct answer.

An excerpt from your your 2010 Owners Manual concerning fuel use in the 3.7L engine:
"Your vehicle will run normally on 87 octane regular fuel. Premium fuel will provide improved performance."

There is more, but it is best to get the information from the proper, verifiable source. And that would be your Owners Manual.

Now for my opinion concerning which fuel octane to use: The engine management system in your 2010 MKS with the 3.7L engine can take advantage of higher octanefuel. It will give you a few more horsepower.(~10-20). However, is premium worth the added cost if your car runs well on 87 octane? In my opinion, not really. If you have some special conditions once in a while when you may want to use premium, like a trip over the Rockies or hot summer temperatures, maybe give it a shot. But otherwise, it is not worth the added cost, since it does not give any added fuel mileage benefits, only a few more horsepower.

Hope this information helps and good luck.
 

Rusty Boltz

Senior Member
308
7
18
Fort Worth, TX
Now for my opinion concerning which fuel octane to use: The engine management system in your 2010 MKS with the 3.7L engine can take advantage of higher octanefuel. It will give you a few more horsepower.(~10-20). However, is premium worth the added cost if your car runs well on 87 octane? In my opinion, not really. If you have some special conditions once in a while when you may want to use premium, like a trip over the Rockies or hot summer temperatures, maybe give it a shot. But otherwise, it is not worth the added cost, since it does not give any added fuel mileage benefits, only a few more horsepower.

Hope this information helps and good luck.
I drove my 3.7 (N/A) MKS around Colorado this past summer. Regular gas was only 86 octane, so I used mid-grade 88 octane. No problems.
 
ALL,
Hey, I really appreciate the advice and suggestions.
1. Check owners manual. I have it and will as needed (although I'm very open to hearing unofficial recommendations/advice from those with more experience).
2. The "cost" of premium is not an issue for me. A few dollars...won't hurt me to skip a 'happy meal' now and then.
3. My main interest was causing harm to engine components by using premium...don't want to damage the cat./converter or other engine parts.
For what it's worth -- I only purchased the car this week. The previous owner claimed to average 18mpg and only ever used 87 octane (the trip computer agrees with his 18mpg). My first (and only thus far) fill-up was with Premium. I reset the mpg computer. ...so far mpg is registering 23.7mpg. Disclaimer: my driving still is 'old-guy' and 95% hwy (aprx 80mi round trip to/from office). San Antonio, Texas. Temps usually uppr 90s. (cold front expected to take us down to mid-80s next week) :)
REALLY APPRECIATE THE ADVISE! ((my next post will concern an extended warranty option/offer))
Cheers all! -D
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Using higher than recommended octane gas WILL NOT hurt anything. The owner's manual will tell you to use a minimum of 87 octane. It does not say that you shouldn't use higher, it just says to use a "minimum" of 87. I use 89 in both my MKS's. I owned 3 auto repair shops for 45 years before I retired, and we did our share of engine repairs---mainly head R&R's for burned exhaust valves. I attribute that to constant use of 87 octane gas. Higher octane gas burns slower and cooler---That's why when your engine pings or knocks, the cure is higher octane gas--It burns slower & cooler eliminating the ping or knock. Remember, the auto manufacturers don't want their cars to last forever---They only want them to last as long as the car is under warranty. I have always used gas of higher octane than recommended and have never experienced an engine failure !!!
 

Airborne

New member
21
3
3
Using higher than recommended octane gas WILL NOT hurt anything. The owner's manual will tell you to use a minimum of 87 octane. It does not say that you shouldn't use higher, it just says to use a "minimum" of 87. I use 89 in both my MKS's. I owned 3 auto repair shops for 45 years before I retired, and we did our share of engine repairs---mainly head R&R's for burned exhaust valves. I attribute that to constant use of 87 octane gas. Higher octane gas burns slower and cooler---That's why when your engine pings or knocks, the cure is higher octane gas--It burns slower & cooler eliminating the ping or knock. Remember, the auto manufacturers don't want their cars to last forever---They only want them to last as long as the car is under warranty. I have always used gas of higher octane than recommended and have never experienced an engine failure !!!
A common misconception is that higher octane fuel burns cooler and faster. A simple Google search will find that a higher octane number means that fuel can withstand more compression before detonation. Nothing more, nothing less. Basic rule of thumb is higher compression engines (including engines with turbos) require higher octane fuel, lower compression motors (most production N/A) get get away with lower octane ratings. In today's engine management system it doesn't make much difference because the ECU constantly monitors and adjusts so no damage will occur to the engine. The ECU "pulls back" within miliseconds of sensing predetonation. Therefore, you would have more power output if the ECU was not adjusting for predetonation due to running a lower octane fuel. Are you going to feel the power difference or improved fuel economy on a 3.7, N/A,10.8:1 comp ratio? Most people wont, I don't and because I don't feel a difference, I use 87 octane in that platform. I do notice it in my Ecoboost platform, therefore I run 91 octane in those cars.
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WanderingSol07

New member
13
0
1
Engines today usually have anti knock sensors, when they 'hear' the engine knocking timing is retarded to stop it. Less power though. Using higher octane will not hurt and may actually improve performance. If you have a turbo you may see noticeable improvement. Cars with a turbo and a performance tune will require 91 octane (or more). With a naturally aspirated engine at altitude, a higher octane will not help at all.
 

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