2004 town car ticking noise

Tree Top

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What could be causing my 2004 lincoln town car to start ticking when i start up but after a few minutes it stops and it runs good?
 

Ghost133

Member
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8
Ridgeway SC
If the ticking is only there when the vehicle is first started, and then it goes away, it is typically due to an exhaust leak. When the exhaust leaks around the exhaust manifold it will make this noise until it expands from heat and seals it up.
 

Tree Top

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If the ticking is only there when the vehicle is first started, and then it goes away, it is typically due to an exhaust leak. When the exhaust leaks around the exhaust manifold it will make this noise until it expands from heat and seals it up.

Is there any way i can fix this myself and is something i can take care of later?
 

04TC

Junior Member
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Tampa, FL
Is there any way i can fix this myself and is something i can take care of later?

You can keep driving it for the time being, it won't damage anything. Won't cause any damage but you might notice the engine running imperfectly while it is making the noise. If it is an exhaust manifold leak I don't think it's a good idea to try to fix it yourself.
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Tree Top

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You can keep driving it for the time being, it won't damage anything. Won't cause any damage but you might notice the engine running imperfectly while it is making the noise. If it is an exhaust manifold leak I don't think it's a good idea to try to fix it yourself.

Ok, thanks for the info and I'll keep all that you told me in mind.
 

CuttingToolGuy

Active member
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Houston
I hate to disagree with Ghost133 but, you really ought to make sure the ticking is coming from the exhaust.

I have seen a handful of 4.6 motors that develop a ticking because the timing chains are "lose". The 4.6 motors are designed to have a hydraulic cylinder press a plastic guide against the chain's long side to take up tension.

While the car is at rest the tensioner slackens and allows the timing chain to be loose. This causes a ticking sound at the front of the motor until the oil pressure builds up enough to tighten the chains.

The three theories of why this happens are; 1) Wrong weight of oil used, 2) Wrong oil filter that allows oil to drain while the car is stopped & 3) a ratcheting mechanism on the hydraulic cylinder messes up.

If you "just drive it", every time you start the car you can be causing excessive wear on the plastic guides in two ways. 1) plastic is shaved off of the guide making fine hairs that work their way down to clog the oil pick up tube and 2) plastic and metal chunks can be broken off that make their way down to clog the oil pick up tube.

Do what you want. I would listen real hard at starting with the hood raised and maybe an automotive stethoscope to pin down where the ticking is coming from.
 

Tree Top

New member
6
2
3
I hate to disagree with Ghost133 but, you really ought to make sure the ticking is coming from the exhaust.

I have seen a handful of 4.6 motors that develop a ticking because the timing chains are "lose". The 4.6 motors are designed to have a hydraulic cylinder press a plastic guide against the chain's long side to take up tension.

While the car is at rest the tensioner slackens and allows the timing chain to be loose. This causes a ticking sound at the front of the motor until the oil pressure builds up enough to tighten the chains.

The three theories of why this happens are; 1) Wrong weight of oil used, 2) Wrong oil filter that allows oil to drain while the car is stopped & 3) a ratcheting mechanism on the hydraulic cylinder messes up.

If you "just drive it", every time you start the car you can be causing excessive wear on the plastic guides in two ways. 1) plastic is shaved off of the guide making fine hairs that work their way down to clog the oil pick up tube and 2) plastic and metal chunks can be broken off that make their way down to clog the oil pick up tube.

Do what you want. I would listen real hard at starting with the hood raised and maybe an automotive stethoscope to pin down where the ticking is coming from.

Thanks for this info...
 
The timing chain guide thing is real. Ford had the same problem with the 5.4L V8.

One recommendation I have seen is to install a magnetic oil pan plug. If you are having a problem with your timing chain guides you will have metal shavings that turn up in the oil. If you have a magnetic oil pan plug you can check it when you change the oil to see if you are getting shavings.

Or so I have read online. I tried to get that done @ the Ford shop last weekend when I pulled in for an oil change. They said they would have to order a magnetic plug so I figured I would just buy one and bring it with me next time I have the oil change done.
 

Norms1stTC

Member
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18
Are you sure it isn't your air compressor pumping up your rear suspension ?
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wolf_walker

Junior Member
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Mine has been doing that for, 20K miles? Lot's of them do, eventually.
There are a handful of ford v8's of that era in my neighborhood that make way more noise
on cold start, the owners seem oblivious.
I assume (the worst) that it's timing chain guides.
If I get to it before it falls apart, great. If I don't I can buy a motor with a quarter of the mileage
for $700 or less and swap it in a weekend.
I let it warm up in the cold months till it quiets down and use good oil.
240K miles fwiw. Nothing lasts forever.
 
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