2004 Air Bag warning light

katdance5

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Hi :) so the air bag warning light came today. Am wondering what might be the most common cause and price to fix it in the Baltimore area.

* I love this car, but it's starting to nickle and dime me, and nearly did not make it out of the tunnel with out a tow truck. (Water pump $320, very reasonable I think.)

*Any suggestions for longevity and safety? Thanks! K
 

YoungOldMan

Member
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Are you having any issues with steering wheel controls (e.g. volume, cruise, etc.)?

For longevity you mainly just need to do routine maintenance and also expect certain parts to fail after a while. Alternators, water pumps, window regulators, etc. all have a shelf life and eventually need to be replaced. Unless you start having serious issues, like a busted timing chain or a blown head, you should be able to drive that engine until the sun explodes.
 

Town

Senior Member
4,398
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Ottawa Ontario Canada
The air bag is part of the supplemental restraints system (SRS) which has a control module. I would suspect that the SRS module would contain the DTC (Diagnostic Trouble Code) that the air bag light is based upon. I would get the OBD2 reader to see if there is any code in the PCM. Otherwise you would need a scanner to access the SRS module to retrieve the code and identify the cause.

The SRS also controls the explosive device in the seatbelts anchor to take out belt slack in an accident.

SRS problems do not come up a lot and I cannot say what the most common would be. Your dealer can certainly diagnose the problem if you don't have an OBD2 reader which only costs $30 or so for a DIY model. But those only access the PCM (powertrain control module) so may not help in this case.
 

katdance5

New member
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1
The air bag is part of the supplemental restraints system (SRS) which has a control module. I would suspect that the SRS module would contain the DTC (Diagnostic Trouble Code) that the air bag light is based upon. I would get the OBD2 reader to see if there is any code in the PCM. Otherwise you would need a scanner to access the SRS module to retrieve the code and identify the cause.

The SRS also controls the explosive device in the seatbelts anchor to take out belt slack in an accident.

SRS problems do not come up a lot and I cannot say what the most common would be. Your dealer can certainly diagnose the problem if you don't have an OBD2 reader which only costs $30 or so for a DIY model. But those only access the PCM (powertrain control module) so may not help in this case.
Thanks.
______________________________
 

katdance5

New member
6
0
1
Are you having any issues with steering wheel controls (e.g. volume, cruise, etc.)?

For longevity you mainly just need to do routine maintenance and also expect certain parts to fail after a while. Alternators, water pumps, window regulators, etc. all have a shelf life and eventually need to be replaced. Unless you start having serious issues, like a busted timing chain or a blown head, you should be able to drive that engine until the sun explodes.
As a rule I don't use the steering controls. The rear assist does not work if the outside temperature is above 40, but does in the freezing cold; and, the power locks quit working (haven't tried replacement battery). Radio works well!! Lol
 

katdance5

New member
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As a rule I don't use the steering controls. The rear assist does not work if the outside temperature is above 40, but does in the freezing cold; and, the power locks quit working (haven't tried replacement battery). Radio works well!! Lol
Oh, I thought it did seem that the cruise control took some time off this summer, but returned and worked fine.
 

YoungOldMan

Member
62
6
8
As a rule I don't use the steering controls. The rear assist does not work if the outside temperature is above 40, but does in the freezing cold; and, the power locks quit working (haven't tried replacement battery). Radio works well!! Lol
Try using your steering controls and see if they give you any trouble. I had a similar issue with a Jeep about a year ago and the problem ended up being a bad steering wheel clock spring, which supplies power to the airbag and carries the signals for the steering wheel controls. You may also want to check fuse #10 in the passenger compartment fuse box. Barring either of those bearing fruit, Town pretty much nailed it.
 

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