lincoln forums   lincoln forum
Direct Links: MKZ | MKS | New Continental (Old) | MKT | MKX | MKC | Navigator | Town Car | LS
Lincoln Forum: 1995 Town Car no start
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    simmer71 is offline Junior Member My Lincoln(s): 1995 Town Car Cartier
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    St. Charles, MO
    Posts
    6

    1995 Town Car no start

    Remove this ad
    Hi all. My 95 TC with 46k has a intermittent starting issue. The car will start if the battery has a full 12 volts. When I turn the key I will hear the fuel pump prime and the car will start. If the battery voltage is below 12 volts, like 11.8, the car won't start. If I turn the key I don't hear the fuel pump prime and the engine just cranks. I can hook up a fully charged jump box and the car will start. My question is does that fuel pump need the full 12 volts to work?

  2. #2
    Town's Avatar
    Town is online now Senior Member My Lincoln(s): 2017 Lincoln Continental Reserve 2.7 AWD
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Ottawa Ontario Canada
    Age
    72
    Posts
    2,431
    Quote Originally Posted by simmer71 View Post
    Hi all. My 95 TC with 46k has a intermittent starting issue. The car will start if the battery has a full 12 volts. When I turn the key I will hear the fuel pump prime and the car will start. If the battery voltage is below 12 volts, like 11.8, the car won't start. If I turn the key I don't hear the fuel pump prime and the engine just cranks. I can hook up a fully charged jump box and the car will start. My question is does that fuel pump need the full 12 volts to work?
    The full 12 volts is actually 12.6 volts to 12.8 volts, and most of the electrics will work at 12 volts, but 11.8 is very low and you will get issues. The fuel pump does not need anything special in terms of voltage. When you switch the ignition on the fuel pump should run briefly to bring the system up to pressure. Your starter motor does need a good battery but would not affect the fuel pump from running. Also, a sulphated battery will not hold much of a charge and the voltage will be down a lot. A good battery will show about 12.6 to 12.8 volts when fully charged (and off the charger for an hour or so to dissipate the surface charge). A shop can do a load test on the battery to ensure it is in good condition and an amps draw test for the starter.

    If you have a digital voltmeter you can check the battery voltage and the charge voltage (13 to 14 volts) with engine running about 2,000 rpm (idle is 600 rpm, cold start idle is about 1,500 rpm). Let us know what your readings are.

    Good luck.

  3. #3
    simmer71 is offline Junior Member My Lincoln(s): 1995 Town Car Cartier
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    St. Charles, MO
    Posts
    6
    Thanks for the reply. I did put the battery on a trickle charge with the cables unhooked for a few hours yesterday. I checked the voltage right after I removed the trickle charger and got around 12.2 volts. I hooked back up the cables and tried to start the car. It just cranked over, but I turned the key off then back on twice and then the car started right up. The voltage after about 20 seconds of the car running and got about 12.8 volts. I let the car idle down and after a few minutes the voltage was 12.4 volts. Is it possible that a 22 year old fuel pump is getting bad? The car only gets driven about 100 miles a year and with only 46k on it, it has sat more than it has been driven.

  4. #4
    Town's Avatar
    Town is online now Senior Member My Lincoln(s): 2017 Lincoln Continental Reserve 2.7 AWD
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Ottawa Ontario Canada
    Age
    72
    Posts
    2,431
    Remove this ad
    Your battery voltage readings show the battery is sulfated and is not being charged properly. This happens when a battery is left unused for long periods of time. The deposits are added as the battery discharges and then are removed (turned back into sulfuric acid and other original components of the new battery) when charging. If charging is not complete then some deposits remain and over time become hard crystaline structures that decrease the battery capability to receive a charge or produce a charge. The battery is then sulfated. You need a pulse charger that will help to eliminate the deposits on the battery plates over time. They are not cheap, but neither are batteries.

    Battery voltage at about 80F will show the state of charge of the battery as follows: 12.6 volts = 100% charge, 12.4 volts = 75% charge, 12.2 volts = 50% charge, 12 volts = 25% charge, and 11.8 volts = 0% charge. So your battery is now normally between 0% charge and 50% charge. The low charge rate (12.8 volts after 20 seconds) with the car running may also indicate the severity of your sulfation problem but could also indicate an alternator that needs replacement.

    I think your fuel pump is fine, it is a victim of the discharged battery. Put your headlamps on and try to start your car. The lights will likely go out or very dim and the starter will not turn the engine over quickly. I would get the battery and alternator tested to confirm what needs to be replaced and that service is usually free.

    Good luck.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Genesis Motors

 
Check out what the competition is up to. The Kia Stinger is a large, twin turbo sport-oriented hatchback in the mold of the Audi A7.